Home
A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

4866 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

After natural forest disturbances such as wildfires, windstorms and insect outbreaks, salvage logging is commonly applied to reduce economic losses and mitigate subsequent disturbance risk. However, this practice is controversial due to its potential ecological impacts, and its capacity to mitigate or increase the risk of subsequent...
Author(s): Alexandro B. Leverkus, Brian Buma, Joseph W. Wagenbrenner, Philip J. Burton, Emanuele Lingua, Raffaella Marzano, Simon Thorn
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Recent increases in destructive wildfires are driving a need for empirical research documenting factors that contribute to structure loss. Existing studies show that fire risk is complex and varies geographically, and the role of vegetation has been especially difficult to quantify. Here, we evaluated the relative importance of...
Author(s): Alexandra D. Syphard, Heather Rustigian-Romsos, Jon E. Keeley
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Children and youth are among the most vulnerable to the devastating effects of disaster due to the physical, cognitive, and social factors related to their developmental life stage. Yet children and youth also have the capacity to be resilient and act as powerful catalysts for change in their own lives and wider communities...
Author(s): Caroline McDonald-Harker, Julie Drolet, Anika Sehgal, Matthew R. G. Brown, Peter H. Silverstone, Pamela Brett-MacLean, Vincent I. O. Agyapong
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fine particulate matter, PM2.5, has been documented to have adverse health effects, and wildland fires are a major contributor to PM2.5 air pollution in the USA. Forecasters use numerical models to predict PM2.5 concentrations to warn the public of impending health risk. Statistical methods are needed to calibrate the numerical...
Author(s): Suman Majumder, Yawen Guan, Brian J. Reich, Susan M. O'Neill, Ana G. Rappold
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Forest operations can affect soil productivity by impacting the amount and distribution of surface organic matter (OM) and changing the properties of surface mineral soil. The North American Long-Term Soil Productivity Study (LTSP) was developed to address such long-term changes after pulse disturbances associated with clearcut...
Author(s): Deborah S. Page-Dumroese, Martin F. Jurgensen, Chris A. Miller, Matt Busse, Michael P. Curran, Thomas A. Terry, Joanne M. Tirocke, Jim Archuleta, Michael P. Murray
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Delaying protective action decision making in wildfire is inconsistent with fire authorities’ advice and is associated with fatalities. A comprehensive understanding of why at-risk residents wait and see whether they will evacuate from a wildfire or remain to shelter or defend can better inform wildfire safety policy and practice....
Author(s): Ken Strahan, John Gilbert
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Large, high‐severity wildfires are an important component of disturbance regimes around the world and can influence the structure and function of forest ecosystems. Climatic changes and anthropogenic disturbances have altered global disturbance patterns and increased the frequency of high‐severity wildfires worldwide. While the...
Author(s): Elle J. Bowd, David Blair, David B. Lindenmayer
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The dead foliage of scorched crowns is one of the most conspicuous signatures of wildland fires. Globally, crown scorch from fires in savannas, woodlands, and forests causes tree stress and death across diverse taxa. The term crown scorch, however, is inconsistently and ambiguously defined in the literature, causing confusion and...
Author(s): J. Morgan Varner, Sharon M. Hood, Doug P. Aubrey, Kara M. Yedinak, J. Kevin Hiers, William Matt Jolly, Timothy M. Shearman, Jennifer K. McDaniel, Joseph J. O'Brien, Eric Rowell
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Aim: Fine‐scale topography and canopy cover can play an important role in mediating effects of regional‐scale climate change on the below‐canopy environment in mountain forests. The aim of this study was to determine how below‐canopy temperatures in a high‐elevation Rocky Mountain forest have been affected by canopy change resulting...
Author(s): Amanda R. Carlson, Jason S. Sibold, Jose F. Negron
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire and fuel management is a high priority in North American sagebrush ecosystems where the expansion of piñon and juniper trees and the invasion of nonnative annual grasses are altering fire regimes and resulting in loss of sagebrush species and habitat. We evaluated 10‐yr effects of woody fuel treatments on sagebrush recruitment...
Author(s): Jeanne C. Chambers, Alexandra K. Urza, David Board, Richard F. Miller, David A. Pyke, Bruce A. Roundy, Eugene Schupp, Robin J. Tausch
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

Pages

XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).