Home
A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 3,600 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

4194 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Abrupt ecological changes occur rapidly relative to typical rates of ecosystem change and are increasingly observed in ecosystems worldwide, thereby challenging adaptive capacities. Abrupt ecological changes can arise from many processes, only some of which are transitions between alternative states. Focusing solely on the mean...
Author(s): Zak Ratjczak, S. R. Carpenter, A. R. Ives, Chris J. Kucharik, T. Ramiadantsoa, A. M. Stegner, J. Williams, J. Zhang, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Existing research suggests that adoption or development of various wildfire management strategies may differ across communities. However, there have been few attempts to design diverse strategies for local populations to better “live with fire.” This article extends an existing approach by articulating how characteristic patterns of...
Author(s): Travis B. Paveglio, Matthew S. Carroll, Amanda M. Stasiewicz, Daniel R. Williams, Dennis Becker
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Sustainable fire management has eluded all industrial societies. Given the growing number and magnitude of wildfire events, prescribed fire is being increasingly promoted as the key to reducing wildfire risk. However, smoke from prescribed fires can adversely affect public health. We propose that the application of air quality...
Author(s): David M. J. S. Bowman, Lori D. Daniels, Fay H. Johnston, Grant J. Williamson, William Matt Jolly, Sheryl Magzamen, Ana G. Rappold, Michael Brauer, Sarah B. Henderson
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Expanding the footprint of natural fire has been proposed as one potential solution to increase the pace of forest restoration programs in fire‐adapted landscapes of the western USA. However, studies that examine the long‐term socio‐ecological trade‐offs of expanding natural fire to reduce wildfire risk and create fire resilient...
Author(s): Ana M. G. Barros, Alan A. Ager, Michelle A. Day, Meg A. Krawchuk, Thomas A. Spies
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Globally, wildfire size and frequency has increased in the last thirty years across numerous ecosystems. Models predict that trend to continue with increases in temperature and shifts in seasonal precipitation caused by climate change. In the western United States, these trends are exacerbated by invasive annual grasses that create...
Author(s): Eva K. Strand, Beth A. Newingham, Chris Bowman-Prideaux
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
The socio-environmental dimension in wildland fire management is critical for moving towards a baseline of firewise planning. Wildland fire risk planning is a land use planning tool that should be able to keep pace with rapid rates of social and environmental change. Changes in land use and climate bring alterations in fire regimes...
Author(s): David Martín Gallego, Eduard Plana Bach, Domingo Molina Terrén
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Dendroecology is the science that dates tree rings to their exact calendar year of formation to study processes that influence forest ecology (e.g., Speer 2010 [1], Amoroso et al., 2017 [2]). Reconstruction of past fire regimes is a core application of dendroecology, linking fire history to population dynamics and climate effects on...
Author(s): Grant Harley, Christopher H. Baisan, Peter M. Brown, Donald A. Falk, William T. Flatley, Henri D. Grissino-Mayer, Amy E. Hessl, Emily K. Heyerdahl, Margot W. Kaye, Charles W. Lafon, Ellis Q. Margolis, R. Stockton Maxwell, Adam T. Naito, William J. Platt, Monica T. Rother, Tom Saladyga, Rosemary L. Sherriff, Lauren A. Stachowiak, Michael C. Stambaugh, Elaine Kennedy Sutherland, Alan H. Taylor
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Rodent populations respond quickly to changes in habitat structure and composition resulting from disturbances such as wildfires. Rodents may recolonise burnt areas from individuals that survived the wildfire in ‘internal refuges’ or from the surrounding unburnt area (i.e. external colonisation). With the aim of assessing the...
Author(s): Roger Puig-Gironès, Miguel Clavero, Pere Pons
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Weather is an important factor that determines smoke development, which is essential information for planning smoke field measurements. This study identifies the synoptic systems that would favor to produce the desired smoke plumes for the Fire and Smoke Model Evaluation Experiment (FASMEE). Daysmoke and PB-Piedmont (PB-P) models...
Author(s): Yongqiang Liu, Scott L. Goodrick, Gary Achtemeier
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The complexity and demands of wildland firefighting in the western U.S. have increased over recent decades due to factors including the expansion of the wildland-urban interface, lengthening fire seasons associated with climate change, and changes in vegetation due to past fire suppression and timber harvest. In light of these...
Author(s): Karen L. Riley, Matthew P. Thompson, Joe H. Scott, Julie W. Gilbertson-Day
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

Pages

XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).