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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,000 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

4688 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

In the paper by T. K. Refsland and J. M. Fraterrigo (“Both canopy and understory traits act as response‐effect traits in fire‐managed forests,” Ecosphere 8(12):e02036), the images for Figs. 2 and 3 appear exchanged. The figures and their legends should appear as follows. The authors regret the error.
Author(s): Tyler Refsland, Jennifer Fraterrigo
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Sagebrush is one of the most imperiled ecosystems in western North America, having lost about half of its original 62 million hectare extent. Annual grass invasions are known to be increasing wildfire occurrence and burned area, but the lasting effects (greater than five years post‐fire) that the resulting reburns have on these...
Author(s): Adam L. Mahood, Jennifer Balch
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires are a natural disturbance that are increasing in size and severity in forested landscapes across the Western United States. Forest fires affect water quality in the disrupted watershed, which can significantly alter the aquatic ecosystem, including sensitive trout (Salmonidae) and macroinvertebrate species. However, the...
Author(s): Terri S. Hogue, John McCray
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
The increasing use of prescribed fires, as a fire management technique for preventing wildfires and reducing their impact, demands the development of tools that enable performing the necessary studies for determining application opportunities in the territory. The generation of interesting uses of this technique not only directed to...
Author(s): Francisco Rodriguez y Silva
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
As highly productive and biologically diverse communities, healthy quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides; hereafter aspen) forests provide a wide range of ecosystem services across western North America. Western aspen decline during the last century has been attributed to several causes and their interactions, including altered fire...
Author(s): Stanley G. Kitchen, Patrick N. Behrens, Sherel Goodrich, Ashley Green, John Guyon, Mary H. O'Brien, David Tart
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Scope: The Interagency Standards for Fire and Fire Aviation Operations states, references, or supplements policy for Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest 6 Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, and Bureau of Indian Affairs fire and fire aviation program management. Original source policy is stated or...
Author(s): Interagency Standards for Fire and Fire Aviation Operations Group
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Coarse woody debris (CWD; large parts of dead trees) is a vital element of forest ecosystems, playing an important role in nutrient cycling, carbon storage, fire fuel, microhabitats, and overall forest structure. However, there is a lack of effective tools for identifying and mapping both standing (snags) and downed (logs) CWD in...
Author(s): Gustavo Lopes Queiroz, Gregory J. McDermid, Guillermo Castilla, Julia Linke, Mir Mustafizur Rahman
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The NWCG Standards for Wildland Fire Module Operations standardizes procedures and expectations for Wildland Fire Modules (WFMs). These standards are to be used by staff, supervisors, specialists, and technicians for planning, administering, and conducting WFM operations. These standards will also be used as a measure of WFM...
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Management or Planning Document
South-eastern France is strongly affected by wildfires mostly occurring in the wildland–urban interfaces (WUIs). A WUI fire is often initiated in dead surface fuel, then can propagate to shrubs and trees when the lower canopy is close to (or touches) the ground. Whereas a previous study assessed the fire propagation from the fuel...
Author(s): L. Terrei, Aymeric Lamorlette, Anne Ganteaume
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Lidar is an established tool for mapping forest structure, but its sparse spatial and temporal coverage often preclude its use in studying forest disturbance. In contrast, aerial imagery has been and continues to be regularly collected in many regions, and advances in stereo image matching have automated the creation of dense...
Author(s): Steven K. Filippelli, Michael A. Lefsky, Monique E. Rocca
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).