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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

103 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Wildfire behavior depends on the type, quantity, and condition of fuels, and the effect that bark beetle outbreaks have on fuels is a topic of current research and debate. Remote sensing can provide estimates of fuels across landscapes, although few studies have estimated surface fuels from remote sensing data. Here we predicted and...
Author(s): Benjamin C. Bright, Andrew T. Hudak, Arjan J. H. Meddens, Todd J. Hawbaker, Jennifer S. Briggs, Robert E. Kennedy
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Hand-constructed piles in eastern Washington and north-central New Mexico were weighed periodically between October 2011 and June 2015 to develop decay-rate constants that are useful for estimating the rate of piled biomass loss over time. Decay-rate constants (k) were determined by fitting negative exponential curves to time series...
Author(s): Clinton S. Wright, Alexander M. Evans, Joseph C. Restaino
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Management in fire-prone ecosystems relies widely upon application of prescribed fire and/or firesurrogate (e.g., forest thinning) treatments to maintain biodiversity and ecosystem function. The literature suggests fire and mechanical treatments proved more variable in their effects on understory vegetation as compared to their...
Author(s): Joshua Willms, Anne Bartuszevige, Dylan W. Schwilk, Patricia L. Kennedy
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Estimates of decomposition rates of coarse woody debris (CWD) and fluxes of nutrients therein are essential components of carbon (C) and nutrient budget models. In a 30-year field experiment, we periodically measured mass remaining and nutrient concentrations in log segments of pine, spruce, and fir in natural, mature coniferous...
Author(s): Cindy E. Prescott, Kristen Corrao, Anya Reid, Jenna M. Zukswert, Shalom D. Addo-Danso
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Biological decomposition and wildfire are connected carbon release pathways for dead plant material: slower litter decomposition leads to fuel accumulation. Are decomposition and surface fires also connected through plant community composition, via the species’ traits? Our central concept involves two axes of trait variation related...
Author(s): Johannes H. C. Cornelissen, Saskia Grootemaat, Lieneke M. Verheijen, William K. Cornwell, Peter M. van Bodegom, Rene Van der Wal, Rien Aerts
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Mastication is a wildland fuel treatment technique that is rapidly becoming popular with fire managers for fire hazard reduction projects, especially in areas where reducing fuels with prescribed fire is particularly challenging. Mastication is the process of mechanically modifying the live and dead surface and canopy biomass by...
Author(s): Robert E. Keane, Pamela G. Sikkink, Theresa B. Jain, James J. Reardon
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Forests historically associated with frequent fire have changed dramatically due to fire suppression and past harvesting over the last century. The buildup of ladder fuels, which carry fire from the surface of the forest floor to tree crowns, is one of the critical changes, and it has contributed to uncharacteristically large and...
Author(s): Heather A. Kramer, Brandon M. Collins, Frank K. Lake, Marek K. Jakubowski, Scott L. Stephens, Maggi Kelly
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildland fires propagate by liberating energy contained within living and senescent plant biomass. The maximum amount of energy that can be generated by burning a given plant part can be quantified and is generally referred to as its heat content (HC). Many studies have examined heat content of wildland fuels but studies examining...
Author(s): Yi Qi, William Matt Jolly, Philip E. Dennison, Rachel C. Kropp
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The objective of this paper is to examine the sensitivity of fuel moisture to changes in temperature and precipitation and explore the implications under a future climate. We use the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index System components to represent the moisture content of fine surface fuels (Fine Fuel Moisture Code, FFMC), upper...
Author(s): Michael D. Flannigan, B. Mike Wotton, Ginny A. Marshall, William J. de Groot, Jill F. Johnstone, N. Jurko, Alan S. Cantin
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The escalating awareness of non-forested landscapes and realization that more emphasis is needed for an all lands approach to management increasingly requires timely information to improve management effectiveness. The Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) has been used in a large number of studies to project future vegetation...
Author(s): Matthew C. Reeves
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).