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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,800 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

47 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) is the most widespread tree species in North America, and it is found throughout much of the Mountain West (MW) across a broad range of bioclimatic regions. Aspen typically regenerates asexually and prolifically after fire, and due to its seral status in many western conifer forests, aspen...
Author(s): Douglas J. Shinneman, William L. Baker, Paul C. Rogers, Dominik Kulakowski
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Sagebrush landscapes provide habitat for Sage-Grouse and other sagebrush obligates, yet historical fire regimes and the structure of historical sagebrush landscapes are poorly known, hampering ecological restoration and management. To remedy this, General Land Office Survey (GLO) survey notes were used to reconstruct over two...
Author(s): Beth E. Bukowski, William L. Baker
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) is declining across the western United States. Aspen habitats are diverse plant communities in this region and loss of these habitats can cause shifts in biodiversity, productivity, and hydrology across spatial scales. Western aspen occurs on the majority of sites seral to conifer species, and...
Author(s): Eva K. Strand, Stephen C. Bunting, Lee A. Vierling
Year Published: 2012
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
Humans and their ancestors are unique in being a fire-making species, but ‘natural’ (i.e. independent of humans) fires have an ancient, geological history on Earth. Natural fires have influenced biological evolution and global biogeochemical cycles, making fire integral to the functioning of some biomes. Globally, debate rages about...
Author(s): David M. J. S. Bowman
Year Published: 2011
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Anticipating future forest-fire regimes under changing climate requires that scientists and natural resource managers understand the factors that control fire across space and time. Fire scars-proxy records of fires, formed in the growth rings of long-lived trees-provide an annually accurate window into past low-severity fire...
Author(s): Donald A. Falk, Emily K. Heyerdahl, Peter M. Brown, Calvin A. Farris, Peter Z. Fule, Donald McKenzie, Thomas W. Swetnam, Alan H. Taylor, Megan L. Van Horne
Year Published: 2011
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article, Synthesis
A map of large fires across the western United States.
Author(s): Wendel J. Hann
Year Published: 2008
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
The strategy known as wildland fire use, in which lightning-ignited fires are allowed to burn, is rapidly gaining momentum in the fire management community. Managers need to know the consequences of an increase in area burned that might result from an increase in wildland fire use. One concern of land managers as they consider...
Author(s): Carol Miller
Year Published: 2007
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
A spectacular forest in the center of the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem (CCE) cuts a 15- by 5-km swath along the Flathead River's South Fork around Big Prairie in the middle of the Bob Marshall Wilderness Area in Montana (Figure 13- 1). This wide valley bottom, which contains two patches (of about 1,000 ha each) of the last...
Author(s): Robert E. Keane, Carl H. Key
Year Published: 2007
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire is a primary natural disturbance in most forests of western North America and has shaped their plant and animal communities for millions of years. Native species and fundamental ecological processes are dependent on conditions created by fire. However, many western forests have experienced shifts in wildfire regimes and forest...
Author(s): Reed F. Noss, Jerry F. Franklin, William L. Baker, Tania L. Schoennagel, Peter B. Moyle
Year Published: 2006
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Information about avian responses to fire in the U.S. Rocky Mountains is based solely on studies of crown fires. However, fire management in this region is based primarily on studies of low-elevation ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests maintained largely by frequent understory fires. In contrast to both of these trends, most...
Author(s): Victoria A. Saab, Hugh D. W. Powell, Natasha B. Kotliar, Karen R. Newlon
Year Published: 2005
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article, Synthesis

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).