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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,800 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

159 results


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Soil heating resulting from prescribed burning in the southern US has potential immediate and long-term impacts. Where fire is being restored to long-unburned sites, the duration and depth of soil heating may be substantial, affecting seed banks, soil carbon cycling, and root and rhizosphere systems with often severe repercussions...
Author(s): Leda N. Kobziar, J. Morgan Varner, Jesse K. Kreye, Michael G. Andreu, David R. Godwin
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
In this paper, we develop a systems dynamics model of a coupled human and natural fire-prone system to evaluate changes in wildfire response policy. A primary motivation is exploring the implications of expanding the pace and scale of using wildfires as a forest restoration tool. We implement a model of a forested system composed of...
Author(s): Matthew P. Thompson, Yu Wei, Christopher J. Dunn, Christopher D. O'Connor
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Species that are primarily seral may form stable (self‐sustaining) communities under certain disturbance regimes or environmental conditions, yet such populations may also be particularly vulnerable to ecological change. Aspen (Populus spp.) are generally considered seral throughout the Northern Hemisphere, including P. tremuloides...
Author(s): Douglas J. Shinneman, Susan K. McIlroy
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Forest fires in Galicia have become a serious environmental problem over the years. This is especially the case in the Pontevedra region, where in October 2017 large fires (>500 hectares) burned more than 15,000 Ha. In addition to the area burned being of relevance, it is also very important to know quickly and accurately the...
Author(s): Jose Antonio Sobrino, Rafael Llorens, Cristina Fernández, José M. Fernández-Alonso, José A. Vega
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Following high-severity wildfire, application of mulch on the soil surface is commonly used to stabilize slopes and limit soil erosion potential, protecting ecosystem values at risk. Despite the widespread use of mulch, relatively little is known about its effects on ecosystem recovery and soil processes important for plant re-...
Author(s): Jayne L. Jonas, Erin Berryman, Brett Wolk, Penelope Morgan, Peter R. Robichaud
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Climate change is increasing fire activity in the western United States, which has the potential to accelerate climate-induced shifts in vegetation communities. Wildfire can catalyze vegetation change by killing adult trees that could otherwise persist in climate conditions no longer suitable for seedling establishment and survival...
Author(s): Kimberley T. Davis, Solomon Z. Dobrowski, Philip E. Higuera, Zachary A. Holden, Thomas T. Veblen, Monica T. Rother, Sean A. Parks, Anna Sala, Marco Maneta
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Subalpine forests in the northern Rocky Mountains have been resilient to stand-replacing fires that historically burned at 100- to 300-year intervals. Fire intervals are projected to decline drastically as climate warms, and forests that reburn before recovering from previous fire may lose their ability to rebound. We studied recent...
Author(s): Monica G. Turner, Kristin H. Braziunas, Winslow D. Hansen, Brian J. Harvey
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In sagebrush-dominated shrublands of western North America, warmer temperatures coupled with annual grass invasions are increasing the frequency and extent of wildfires. Postfire sagebrush recovery rates are unpredictable and many recent fires have resulted in the apparent loss of sagebrush habitat, resulting in a pressing need to...
Author(s): Alexandra K. Urza, Peter J. Weisberg, Jeanne C. Chambers, Stanley G. Kitchen, Bruce A. Roundy
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The US Endangered Species Act has enabled species conservation but has differentially impacted fire management and rare bird conservation in the southern and western US. In the South, prescribed fire and restoration‐based forest thinning are commonly used to conserve the endangered red‐cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis; RCW),...
Author(s): Scott L. Stephens, Leda N. Kobziar, Brandon M. Collins, Raymond J. Davis, Peter Z. Fule, William L. Gaines, Joseph L. Ganey, James M. Guldin, Paul F. Hessburg, J. Kevin Hiers, Serra Hoagland, John J. Keane, Ronald E. Masters, Ann E. McKellar, Warren G. Montague, Malcolm P. North, Thomas A. Spies
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
As highly productive and biologically diverse communities, healthy quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides; hereafter aspen) forests provide a wide range of ecosystem services across western North America. Western aspen decline during the last century has been attributed to several causes and their interactions, including altered fire...
Author(s): Stanley G. Kitchen, Patrick N. Behrens, Sherel Goodrich, Ashley Green, John Guyon, Mary H. O'Brien, David Tart
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).