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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,000 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

1667 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

The 2010 Church’s Park Fire burned beetle-killed lodgepole pine stands in Colorado, including recently salvage-logged areas, creating a fortuitous opportunity to compare the effects of salvage logging, wildfire and the combination of logging followed by wildfire. Here, we examine tree regeneration, surface fuels, understory plants,...
Author(s): Charles C. Rhoades, Kristen Pelz, Paula J. Fornwalt, Brett Wolk, Anthony S. Cheng
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Alpine treelines are expected to move upward in a warming climate, but downward in response to increases in wildfire. We studied the effects of fire on vegetation structure and composition across four alpine treeline ecotones extending from Abies lasiocarpa/Picea engelmannii forests at lower elevations, through Pinus albicaulis/...
Author(s): C. Alina Cansler, Donald McKenzie, Charles B. Halpern
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Growing and widespread concern regarding the social and ecological impacts of wildfire has sparked multiple innovations in planning, preparation, and management. Among these innovations are new models of coproduction in which government fire managers collaborate with non-governmental entities on wildfire response. The most prominent...
Author(s): Emily Jane Davis, Jesse Abrams, James E. Meacham
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Nowadays Earth observation satellites, in particular Landsat, provide a valuable help to forest managers in post-fire operations; being the base of post-fire damage maps that enable to analyze fire impacts and to develop vegetation recovery plans. Sentinel-2A MultiSpectral Instrument (MSI) records data in similar spectral...
Author(s): Carmen Quintano, Alfonso Fernández-Manso, O. Fernández-Manso
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Proceedings from the 2014 IUFRO Joint Conference: Genetics of five-needle pines, rusts of forest trees, and Strobusphere in Fort Collins, Colorado. The published proceedings include 91 papers pertaining to research conducted on the genetics and pathology of five-needle pines and rusts of forest trees. Topic areas are: ecology and...
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Although burned trees are the most visible damage following a wildfire, a forest’s soil can also be damaged. The heat generated by a wildfire can alter the soil’s physical properties and kill the fungi and bacteria that are responsible for nutrient cycling and other ecosystem services. What isn’t well understood is the extent of the...
Author(s): Andrea Watts, Jane E. Smith, Ariel D. Cowan, Ari A. Jumpponen
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
When disturbances recur at rates shorter than an ecosystems rate of recovery, it has the potential to result in significant changes to ecosystem structure and function. In western US forests, wildfire activity has increased and many severely burned areas are now re-burning before reforestation occurs. Historically, some of these...
Author(s): Kristen L. Shive, Scott L. Stephens
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Massive tree mortality has occurred rapidly in frequent-fire-adapted forests of the Sierra Nevada, California. This mortality is a product of acute drought compounded by the long-established removal of a key ecosystem process: frequent, low- to moderate-intensity fire. The recent tree mortality has many implications for the future...
Author(s): Scott L. Stephens, Brandon M. Collins, Christopher J. Fettig, Mark A. Finney, Chad M. Hoffman, Eric E. Knapp, Malcolm P. North, Hugh Safford, Rebecca Bewley Wayman
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.), an ecologically important tree species in high-elevation ecosystems of western North America, is threatened by white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola Fischer) and increased pressure from mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) due to climate warming. In addition, there...
Author(s): Jeremy T. Amberson, Megan P. Keville, Cara R. Nelson
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The biogeochemical and stoichiometric signature of vegetation fire may influence post-fire ecosystem characteristics and the evolution of plant ‘fire traits’. Phosphorus (P), a potentially limiting nutrient in many fire-prone environments, might be particularly important in this context; however, the effects of fire on P cycling...
Author(s): Orpheus M. Butler, James J. Elser, Tom Lewis, Brendan Mackey, Chengrong Chen
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).