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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

31 results


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Author(s): Richard Stevens, Stephen B. Monsen
Year Published: 2004
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Land management agencies are restoring ponderosa pine forests and reducing fuel loads by thinning followed by prescribed burning. However, little is known about how this combination of treatments will affect local wildlife. In this study, I focus on the following short-term wildlife responses: 1) differences in avian and small-...
Author(s): Jennifer Woolf
Year Published: 2003
Type: Document : Dissertation or Thesis
Fire, insects, disease, harvesting, and precommercial thinning all create mosaics on Northern Rocky Mountain landscapes. These mosaics are important for faunal habitat. Consequently, changes such as created openings or an increase in heavily stocked areas affect the water, cover, and food of forest habitats. The 'no action'...
Author(s): Helen Y. Smith
Year Published: 2000
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
Fires affect animals mainly through effects on their habitat. Fires often cause short-term increases in wildlife foods that contribute to increases in populations of some animals. These increases are moderated by the animals' ability to thrive in the altered, often simplified, structure of the postfire environment. The extent of...
Year Published: 2000
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
From the Background...'A rapid decline in whitebark pine has occurred during the last 60 years as a result of three interrelated factors: epidemics of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae); the introduced disease white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola); and successional replacement by shade-tolerant conifers,...
Author(s): Robert E. Keane, Stephen F. Arno
Year Published: 1996
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire has been used inconsistently to manage native and tame grasslands in the Northern Great Plains (NGP) of the north-central U.S. and south-central Canada, particularly the grasslands found in prairies, plains, agricultural land retirement programs, and moist soil sites. This has happened for three primary reasons: (1) the...
Author(s): Kenneth F. Higgins, Arnold D. Kruse, James L. Piehl
Year Published: 1989
Type: Document : Synthesis, Technical Report or White Paper
Much of the nearly 7 million acres (2.86 million ha) of aspen in the western United States is seral to conifers. Also, most aspen stands are old, in excess of 60 years. Proper treatment of these aspen forests will retain the aspen and can produce optimum wildlife habitat. Optimally, all age and size classes of aspen should be...
Author(s): Norbert V. DeByle
Year Published: 1985
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
The Bridger-Teton National Forest in the Jackson Hole Region of Wyoming has long been recognized for its wildlife resource. Management efforts have emphasized the measurement of forage utilization by elk (Cervus canadensis nelsoni) and their effect on summer and winter ranges. Less consideration has been given to other biotic and...
Author(s): George E. Gruell
Year Published: 1980
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Provides information on wildlife habitat condition and trend on the Bridger-Teton National Forest in the Jackson Hole Region of Wyoming by analysis of broad plant communities. Visual evidence of condition and trend are provided in Volume I, The Photo Record. Management implications are included.
Author(s): George E. Gruell
Year Published: 1980
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
In an area of 21 km2 where fires have produced a mosaic of forest communities, including subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa), Engelman spruce (Picea engelmannii) and lodgepole pine, results from 255 track observations, 80 captures of 13 live-trapped martens, and scat analysis, over a 13 month period in 1973-1974, suggest that the...
Author(s): Gary M. Koehler, Maurice G. Hornocker
Year Published: 1977
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).