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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,000 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

179 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Fire-driven flows associated with wind intervention can dangerously threaten buildings in bushfire-prone areas by increasing pressure load on the structures through fire-wind enhancement phenomenon. This phenomenon through which wind is enhanced by interacting with fire is exacerbated when the affected terrain is located in a...
Author(s): Esmaeel Eftekharian, Maria Rashidi, Maryam Ghodrat, Yaping He, Kenny C.S. Kwok
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The understanding and prediction of large wildland fire events around the world is a growing interdisciplinary research area advanced rapidly by development and use of computational models. Recent models bidirectionally couple computational fluid dynamics models including weather prediction models with modules containing algorithms...
Author(s): Janice L. Coen, Wilfrid Schroeder, Scott Conway, Leland W. Tarnay
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfire is a natural component of sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe rangelands that induces temporal shifts in plant community physiognomy, ground surface conditions, and erosion rates. Fire alteration of the vegetation structure and ground cover in these ecosystems commonly amplifies soil losses by wind‐ and water‐driven erosion....
Author(s): Samantha P. Vega, C. Jason Williams, Erin S. Brooks, Frederick B. Pierson, Eva K. Strand, Peter R. Robichaud, Robert E. Brown, Mark S. Seyfried, Kathleen A. Lohse, Kayla Glossner, Jennifer L. Pierce, Clay Roehner
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Background tree mortality is a complex process that requires large sample sizes and long timescales to disentangle the suite of ecological factors that collectively contribute to tree stress, decline, and eventual mortality. Tree mortality associated with acute disturbance events, in contrast, is conspicuous and frequently studied,...
Author(s): Tucker J. Furniss, Andrew J. Larson, Van R. Kane, James A. Lutz
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Research Highlights: Our results suggest that weather is a primary driver of resource orders over the course of extended attack efforts on large fires. Incident Management Teams (IMTs) synthesize information about weather, fuels, and order resources based on expected fire growth rather than simply reacting to observed fire growth....
Author(s): Jude Bayham, Erin J. Belval, Matthew P. Thompson, Christopher J. Dunn, Crystal S. Stonesifer, David E. Calkin
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Abrupt changes in wind direction and speed can dramatically impact wildfire development and spread. Most importantly, such changes can pose significant problems to firefighting efforts and have resulted in a number of fire fatalities over the years. Frequent causes of such wind shifts are thunderstorm and convective system outflows...
Author(s): Jordan G. Powers, Jim Bresch, Craig S. Schwartz, Janice L. Coen, Ryan A. Sobash
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Extreme, downslope mountain winds often generate dangerous wildfire conditions. We used the wildfire spread model Fire Area Simulator (FARSITE) to simulate two wildfires influenced by strong wind events in Santa Barbara, CA. High spatial-resolution imagery for fuel maps and hourly wind downscaled to 100 m were used as model inputs,...
Author(s): Katelyn Zigner, Leila M. V. Carvalho, Seth H. Peterson, Francis M. Fujioka, Gert-Jan Duine, Charles Jones, Dar A. Roberts, Max A. Moritz
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Altered climate and changing fire regimes are synergistically impacting forest communities globally, resulting in deviations from historical norms and creation of novel successional dynamics. These changes are particularly important when considering the stability of a keystone species such as quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx...
Author(s): Susan K. McIlroy, Douglas J. Shinneman
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In the United States, many decision support tools exist to provide fire managers with weather and fire behaviour information to inform and facilitate risk-based decision-making. Relatively little is known about how managers use these tools in the field and when and how they may serve to influence decisions. To address this gap, we...
Author(s): Claire Rapp, Emily Rabung, Robyn S. Wilson, Eric L. Toman
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
An important aspect of predicting future wildland fire risk is estimating fire weather-weather conducive to the ignition and propagation of fire-under realistic climate change scenarios. Because the majority of area burned occurs on a few days of extreme fire weather, this task should be able to resolve fire weather extremes. In...
Author(s): Piyush Jain, Mari R. Tye, Debasish Paimazumder, Michael D. Flannigan
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).