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Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 3,600 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

65 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

The field of adaptive management has been embraced by researchers and managers in the United States as an approach to improve natural resource stewardship in the face of uncertainty and complex environmental problems. Integrating multiple knowledge sources and feedback mechanisms is an important step in this approach. Our objective...
Author(s): Christopher A. Armatas, Tyron J. Venn, Brooke Baldauf McBride, Alan E. Watson, Stephen J. Carver
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
This article reviews social science research on Indigenous wildfire management in Australia, Canada and the United States after the year 2000 and explores future research needs in the field. In these three countries, social science research exploring contemporary Indigenous wildfire management has been limited although there have...
Author(s): Amy Christianson
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire-use and the scale and character of its effects on landscapes remain hotly debated in the paleo- and historical-fire literature. Since the second half of the nineteenth century, anthropology and geography have played important roles in providing theoretical propositions and testable hypotheses for advancing understandings of the...
Author(s): Michael R. Coughlan
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Do qualitative classifications of ecological conditions for harvesting culturally important forest plants correspond to quantitative differences among sites? To address this question, we blended scientific methods (SEK) and traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) to identify conditions on sites considered good, marginal, or poor for...
Author(s): Susan S. Hummel, Frank K. Lake
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service is recognized as a leader among Federal land management agencies in partnering collaboratively with American Indian and Alaska Native governments and indigenous communities. The Forest Service Research and Development (R&D) Deputy Area recognizes that working with tribes...
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
For many thousands of years, aboriginal peoples worldwide used fire to manage landscapes. In North America, the frequency and extent of fire (both human caused and natural) were much reduced after European colonization. Fire exclusion became the policy in the United States for most of the 20th century as the country became more...
Author(s): Gail Wells
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
This planning guide is the outcome of an international collaboration of researchers and practitioners/field managers working in communities at risk of wildfire in three countries. Initially, the team of social scientists from Australia, Canada, and the United States utilized the collective research literature to examine factors that...
Author(s): Bruce A. Shindler, Christine Olsen, Sarah M. McCaffrey, Bonita McFarlane, Amy Christianson, Tara K. McGee, Allan Curtis, Emily Sharp
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
National forest management efforts have generally moved toward collaborative and participatory approaches at a variety of scales. This includes, at a larger scale, greater public participation in transparent and inclusive democratic processes and, at a smaller scale, more engagement with local communities. Participatory approaches...
Author(s): Susan Charnley, Jonathan Long, Frank K. Lake
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Native American tribes regard plants that have evolved with frequent fire and other natural resources as living cultural resources that provide, water, food, medicines, and other material goods while also sustaining tribal cultural traditions. Collaborations between management agencies and tribes and other Native American groups can...
Author(s): Frank K. Lake, Jonathan Long
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Indigenous people’s detailed traditional knowledge about fire, although superficially referenced in various writings, has not for the most part been analyzed in detail or simulated by resource managers, wildlife biologists, and ecologists. . . . Instead, scientists have developed the principles and theories of fire ecology, fire...
Author(s): Frank K. Lake
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).