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Contiguous United States wildland fire emission estimates during 2003-2015

Author(s): Shawn P. Urbanski, Matthew C. Reeves, Rachel E. Corley, Robin P. Silverstein, Wei Min Hao
Year Published: 2018
Description:

Wildfires are a major source of air pollutants in the United States. Wildfire smoke can trigger severe pollution episodes with substantial impacts on public health. In addition to acute episodes, wildfires can have a marginal effect on air quality at significant distances from the source, presenting significant challenges to air regulators’ efforts to meet National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Improved emission estimates are needed to quantify the contribution of wildfires to air pollution and thereby inform decision-making activities related to the control and regulation of anthropogenic air pollution sources.

Citation: Urbanski, Shawn P.; Reeves, Matt C.; Corley, Rachel E.; Silverstein, Robin P.; Hao, Wei Min. 2018. Contiguous United States wildland fire emission estimates during 2003-2015. Earth System Science Data. 10: 2241-2274. https://doi.org/10.5194/essd-10-2241-2018
Topic(s): Smoke & Air Quality, Smoke Emissions, Smoke Emissions and Inventory, Monitoring
Ecosystem(s): None
Document Type: Book or Chapter or Journal Article
NRFSN number: 18828
Record updated: Feb 4, 2019