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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,900 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

938 results



There is a widespread view among land managers and others that the protected status of many forestlands in the western United States corresponds with higher fire severity levels due to historical restrictions on logging that contribute to greater amounts of biomass and fuel loading in less intensively managed areas, particularly...
Author(s): Curtis M. Bradley, Chad T. Hanson, Dominick A. DellaSala
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Quantifying the linkages between vegetation disturbance by fire and the changes in hydrologic processes leading to post-fire erosional response remains a challenge. We measured the influence of fire severity, defined as vegetation disturbance (using a satellite-derived vegetation disturbance index, VDI), landscape features that...
Author(s): Kevin D. Hyde, Kelsey Jencso, Andrew C. Wilcox, Scott W. Woods
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The prevailing paradigm in the western U.S. is that the increase in stand-replacing wildfires in historically frequent-fire dry forests is due to unnatural fuel loads that have resulted from management activities including fire suppression, logging, and grazing, combined with more severe drought conditions and increasing...
Author(s): Elizabeth L. Kalies, Larissa L. Yocom Kent
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article, Synthesis
Like many fire-adapted ecosystems, decades of fire exclusion policy in the Rocky Mountains and Foothills natural regions of southern Alberta, Canada are raising concern over the loss of ecological integrity. Departure from historical conditions is evaluated using median fire return intervals (MdFRI) based on fire history data from...
Author(s): Michael D. Flannigan, Brad C. Hawkes, Marc-Andre Parisien, Marie-Pierre Rogeau, Rick Arthur
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires shape the distribution and structure of vegetation across the inland northwestern United States. However, fire activity is expected to increase given the current rate of climate change, with uncertain outcomes. A fire impact that has not been widely addressed is the development of unburned islands; areas within the fire...
Author(s): Arjan J. H. Meddens, Crystal A. Kolden, James A. Lutz
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire regimes are ultimately controlled by wildland fuel dynamics over space and time; spatial distributions of fuel influence the size, spread, and intensity of individual fires, while the temporal distribution of fuel deposition influences fire's frequency and controls fire size. These "shifting fuel mosaics" are both a cause and a...
Author(s): Robert E. Keane
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Habitat alterations may improve and expand wildlife habitats, and bolster waning wildlife populations. We used global positioning system (GPS) locations to monitor 38 bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis Shaw) that were translocated to the Seminoe Mountains, Wyoming, USA, in 2009 and 2010, and 24 bighorns captured in 2011 to investigate...
Author(s): Justin G. Clapp, Jeffrey L. Beck
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Variable-retention harvesting in lodgepole pine offers an alternative to conventional, even-aged management. This harvesting technique promotes structural complexity and age-class diversity in residual stands and promotes resilience to disturbance. We examined fuel loads and potential fire behaviour 12 years after two modes of...
Author(s): Justin S. Crotteau, Christopher R. Keyes, Elaine Kennedy Sutherland, David K. Wright, Joel M. Egan
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In areas where fire regimes and forest structure have been dramatically altered, there is increasing concern that contemporary fires have the potential to set forests on a positive feedback trajectory with successive reburns, one in which extensive stand-replacing fire could promote more stand-replacing fire. Our study utilized an...
Author(s): Michelle Coppoletta, Kyle E. Merriam, Brandon M. Collins
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire frequency is assumed to have exerted a strong influence on historical forest communities in the inland Pacific Northwest. This study reconstructs forest structure and composition in the year 1890 and fire frequency from 1760 to 1890 at 10 sites spanning a broad productivity gradient in the southern Blue Mountains of eastern...
Author(s): James D. Johnston, John D. Bailey, Christopher J. Dunn
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).