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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are nearly 4,000 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

970 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Aim: Functional traits are a crucial link between species distributions and the ecosystem processes that structure those species’ niches. Concurrent increases in the availability of functional trait data and our ability to model species distributions present an opportunity to develop functional trait biogeography (i.e., the mapping...
Author(s): Jens T. Stevens, Matthew M. Kling, Dylan W. Schwilk, J. Morgan Varner, Jeffrey M. Kane
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Accumulating data indicate the importance of fire in rangeland systems. Mowing is a common management technique sometimes considered a surrogate for fire. However, direct comparisons of fire and mowing effects are limited. Our objective was to determine whether mowing can substitute for fire in rangeland by comparing effects on...
Author(s): Lance T. Vermeire, Dustin J. Strong, Emily A. Gates, Clayton B. Marlow, Richard C. Waterman
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Background: Prairie–forest ecotones are ecologically important for biodiversity and ecological processes. While these ecotones cover small areas, their sharp gradients in land cover promote rich ecological interaction and high conservation value. Our objective was to understand how historical and current fire occurrences and human...
Author(s): Penelope Morgan, Emily K. Heyerdahl, Eva K. Strand, Stephen C. Bunting, James P. Riser, John T. Abatzoglou, Max W. Nielsen-Pincus, Mara Johnson
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Improved predictions of tree species mortality and growth metrics following fires are important to assess fire impacts on forest succession, and ultimately forest growth and yield. Recent studies have shown that North American conifers exhibit a 'toxicological dose-response' relationship between fire behavior and the resultant...
Author(s): Wade D. Steady, Raquel Partelli Feltrin, Daniel M. Johnson, Aaron M. Sparks, Crystal A. Kolden, Alan F. Talhelm, James A. Lutz, Luigi Boschetti, Andrew T. Hudak, Andrew S. Nelson, Alistair M. S. Smith
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The Inventory & Monitoring Division of the U.S. National Park Service conducts long-term monitoring to provide park managers information on the status and trends in biological and environmental attributes including white pines. White pines are foundational species in many subalpine ecosystems and are currently experiencing...
Author(s): Jonathan C. B. Nesmith, Micah Wright, Erik S. Jules, Shawn T. McKinney
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The extent of young postfire conifer forests is growing throughout western North America as the frequency and size of high‐severity fires increase, making it important to understand ecosystem structure and function in early seral forests. Understanding nitrogen (N) dynamics during postfire stand development is especially important...
Author(s): Monica G. Turner, Timothy G. Whitby, William H. Romme
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Goals of fostering ecological resilience are increasingly used to guide U.S. public land management in the context of anthropogenic climate change and increasing landscape disturbances. There are, however, few operational means of assessing the resilience of a landscape or ecosystem. We present a method to evaluate resilience using...
Author(s): Robert E. Keane, Rachel A. Loehman, Lisa M. Holsinger, Donald A. Falk, Philip E. Higuera, Sharon M. Hood, Paul F. Hessburg
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Forests are an incredibly important resource across the globe, yet they are threatened by climate change through stressors such as drought, insect outbreaks, and wildfire. Trailing edge forests—those areas expected to experience range contractions under a changing climate—are of particular concern because of the potential for abrupt...
Author(s): Sean A. Parks, Solomon Z. Dobrowski, John D. Shaw, Carol Miller
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfire is the predominant natural disturbance in the boreal forests of western Canada. Natural disturbance-based forest management involves the use of retention harvesting to retain stand structural diversity post-harvest; however, this partial harvesting technique does not cause combustion of the forest floor as does fire....
Author(s): Caroline Mary Adrianne Franklin, Scott E. Nielsen, S. Ellen Macdonald
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The two-part Science Framework for Conservation and Restoration of the Sagebrush Biome published by the U.S. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station is a new, multi-scale approach to management of sagebrush ecosystems. The product of an extensive collaboration between State and Federal agencies and universities, it employs...
Author(s): Susan Miller
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet

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XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).