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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

86 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Quantifying the effects of mountain pine beetle (MPB)-caused tree mortality on potential crown fire hazard has been challenging partly because of limitations in current operational fire behavior models. Such models are not capable of accounting for fuel heterogeneity resulting from an outbreak. Further, the coupled interactions...
Author(s): Chad M. Hoffman, Penelope Morgan, William E. Mell, Russell A. Parsons, Eva K. Strand, Stephen Cook
Year Published: 2012
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Land managers have been using fire behavior and simulation models to assist in several fire management tasks. These widely-used models use average attributes to make stand-level predictions without considering spatial variability of fuels within a stand. Consequently, as the existing models have limitations in adequately modeling...
Author(s): Marco A. Contreras, Russell A. Parsons, Woodam Chung
Year Published: 2012
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The Fourmile Canyon Fire burned in the fall of 2010 in the Rocky Mountain Front Range adjacent to Boulder, Colorado. The fire occurred in steep, rugged terrain, primarily on privately owned mixed ponderosa pine and Douglas-fir forests. The fire started on September 6 when the humidity of the air was very dry (about <7%) and the...
Author(s): Russell T. Graham, Mark A. Finney, Charles W. McHugh, Jack D. Cohen, David E. Calkin, Richard D. Stratton, Ned Nikolov
Year Published: 2012
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
This is a fuel treatment effectiveness assessment report from Region 3 about the success of fuel treatments in protecting several communities from the recent Wallow fire in Arizona and New Mexico. The report narrative and graphics point to the success of good forest management and good community assistance to protect life, property...
Author(s): Pam Bostwick, James P. Menakis, Tim Sexton
Year Published: 2011
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Fire is a keystone process in many ecosystems of western North America. Severe fires kill and consume large amounts of above- and belowground biomass and affect soils, resulting in long-lasting consequences for vegetation, aquatic ecosystem productivity and diversity, and other ecosystem properties. We analyzed the occurrence of,...
Author(s): Gregory K. Dillon, Zachary A. Holden, Penelope Morgan, Michael A. Crimmins, Emily K. Heyerdahl, Charles H. Luce
Year Published: 2011
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
This report provides managers with the current state of knowledge regarding the effectiveness of fuel treatments for mitigating severe wildfire effects. A literature review examines the effectiveness of fuel treatments that had been previously applied and were subsequently burned through by wildfire in forests and rangelands. A case...
Author(s): Andrew T. Hudak, Ian Rickert, Penelope Morgan, Eva K. Strand, Sarah A. Lewis, Peter R. Robichaud, Chad M. Hoffman, Zachary A. Holden
Year Published: 2011
Type: Document : Synthesis, Technical Report or White Paper
Crownfire endangers fire fighters and can have severe ecological consequences. Prediction of fire behavior in tree crowns is essential to informed decisions in fire management. Current methods used in fire management do not address variability in crown fuels. New mechanistic physics-based fire models address convective heat transfer...
Author(s): Russell A. Parsons, William E. Mell, Peter McCauley
Year Published: 2011
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The National Wildfire Coordinating Group definition of extreme fire behavior (EFB) indicates a level of fire behavior characteristics that ordinarily precludes methods of direct control action. One or more of the following is usually involved: high rate of spread, prolific crowning/spotting, presence of fire whirls, and strong...
Author(s): Paul A. Werth, Brian E. Potter, Craig B. Clements, Mark A. Finney, Scott L. Goodrick, Martin E. Alexander, Miguel G. Cruz, Jason M. Forthofer, Sara S. McAllister
Year Published: 2011
Type: Document : Synthesis, Technical Report or White Paper
To control and use wildland fires safely and effectively depends on creditable assessments of fire potential, including the propensity for crowning in conifer forests. Simulation studies that use certain fire modelling systems (i.e. NEXUS, FlamMap, FARSITE, FFE-FVS (Fire and Fuels Extension to the Forest Vegetation Simulator), Fuel...
Author(s): Miguel G. Cruz, Martin E. Alexander
Year Published: 2010
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Large scale fire whirls have not traditionally been recognized as a frequent phenomenon on wildland fires. However, there are anecdotal data suggesting that they can and do occur with some regularity. This paper presents a brief summary of this information and an analysis of the causal factors leading to their formation.
Author(s): Jason M. Forthofer, Bret W. Butler
Year Published: 2010
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).