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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,000 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

536 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

The idea that not all fire regimes are created equal is a central theme in fire research and conservation. Fire frequency (i.e., temporal scale) is likely the most studied fire regime attribute as it relates to conservation of fireadapted ecosystems. Generally, research converges on fire frequency as the primary filter in plant...
Author(s): David Mason, Marcus A. Lashley
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Emissions from a stand replacement prescribed burn were sampled using an unmanned aircraft system (UAS, or 'drone') in Fishlake National Forest, Utah, U.S.A. Sixteen flights over three days in June 2019 provided emission factors for a broad range of compounds including carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitric oxide (NO),...
Author(s): Johanna Aurell, Brian K. Gullett, Amara L. Holder, F. Kiros, William Mitchell, Adam C. Watts, Roger D. Ottmar
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Restoration of fire-prone forests is a common practice intended to increase resilience to wildfire, drought, and bark beetles. However, the long-term effects of restoration treatments on understory species, particularly non-native species, are poorly understood. We investigated long-term (23 years) effects of restoration treatments...
Author(s): Woongsoon Jang, Justin S. Crotteau, Yvette K. Ortega, Sharon M. Hood, Christopher R. Keyes, Dean E. Pearson, Duncan C. Lutes, Anna Sala
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
National and regional preparedness level (PL) designations support decisions about wildfire risk management. Such decisions occur across the fire season and influence pre-positioning of resources in areas of greatest fire potential, recall of personnel from off-duty status, requests for back-up resources from other areas, responses...
Author(s): Alison Cullen, Travis Axe, Harry Podschwit
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Concern about the impacts of two invasive annual brome grasses (cheatgrass and Japanese brome, Bromus tectorum L. and B. japonicus Thunb. ex Murray) on the mixed-grass prairie of North America's northern Great Plains (NGP) is growing. Cheatgrass is well known west of the NGP, where replacement of fire-intolerant, native sagebrush...
Author(s): Amy J. Symstad, Deborah A. Buhl, Daniel J. Swanson
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The intersection of expanding human development and wildland landscapes—the “wildland–urban interface” or WUI—is one of the most vexing contexts for fire management because it involves complex interacting systems of people and nature. Here, we document the dynamism and stability of an ancient WUI that was apparently sustainable for...
Author(s): Christopher I. Roos, Thomas W. Swetnam, T. J. Ferguson, Matthew J. Liebmann, Rachel A. Loehman, John R. Welch, Ellis Q. Margolis, Christopher H. Guiterman, William C. Hockaday, Michael J. Aiuvalasit, Jenna Battillo, Josh Farella, Christopher A. Kiahtipes
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Land treatments in wildland-urban interface (WUI) areas are highly visible and subject to public scrutiny and possible opposition. This study examines a contested vegetation treatment-Forsythe II-in a WUI area of the Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forest in Colorado. An initial phase of the research found vocal opposition to Forsythe II...
Author(s): Hannah Brenkert-Smith, Jody L. Jahn, Eric A. Vance, Juan Ahumada
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Key message: We have explored the impacts of forest thinning on wildland fire behavior using a process based model. Simulating different degrees of thinning, we found out that forest thinning should be conducted cautiously as there could be a wide range of outcomes depending upon the post-thinning states of fuel availability, fuel...
Author(s): Tirtha Banerjee
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Methods to accurately estimate spatially explicit fuel consumption are needed because consumption relates directly to fire behavior, effects, and smoke emissions. Our objective was to quantify sparkleberry (Vaccinium arboretum Marshall) shrub fuels before and after six experimental prescribed fires at Fort Jackson in South Carolina...
Author(s): Andrew T. Hudak, Akira Kato, Benjamin C. Bright, E. Louise Loudermilk, Christie M. Hawley, Joseph C. Restaino, Roger D. Ottmar, Gabriel A. Prata, Carlos Cabo, Susan J. Prichard, Eric Rowell, David R. Weise
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
We assessed plant community succession following prescribed fire on ungrazed Wyoming big sagebrush steppe, eastern Oregon. Treatments were burned (Burn; September and October, 2002) and unburned (Control) sagebrush steppe. Herbaceous yield, vegetation canopy cover and density were compared between treatments after fire (2003–18)....
Author(s): Jonathan D. Bates, Chad S. Boyd, Kirk W. Davies
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).