Home
A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

395 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Climate change is projected to increase fire severity and frequency in the boreal forest, but it could also directly affect post-fire recruitment processes by impacting seed production, germination, and seedling growth and survival. We reviewed current knowledge regarding the effects of high temperatures and water deficits on post-...
Author(s): Dominique Boucher, Sylvie Gauthier, Nelson Thiffault, William Marchand, Martin P. Girardin, Morgane Urli
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire offers a special perspective by which to understand the Earth being remade by humans. Fire is integrative, so intrinsically interdisciplinary. Fire use is unique to humans, so a tracer of humanity's ecological impacts. Anthropogenic fire history shows the long influence of humans on Earth and even climate; in particular, it...
Author(s): Stephen Pyne
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Background: Wildfires in the Pacific Northwest (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and western Montana, USA) have been immense in recent years, capturing the attention of resource managers, fire scientists, and the general public. This paper synthesizes understanding of the potential effects of changing climate and fire regimes on Pacific...
Author(s): Jessica E. Halofsky, David L. Peterson, Brian J. Harvey
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Climate change is transforming forest structure and function by altering the timing, frequency, intensity, and spatial extent of episodic disturbances. Wildland fire regimes in western U.S. coniferous forests are now characterized by longer fire seasons and greater frequency, with further changes expected. Identifying the impacts of...
Author(s): Elizabeth R. Pansing, Diana F. Tomback, Michael B. Wunder
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfire is a growing threat in the western US, driven by high fuel loads, a warming climate, and rising human activity in the wildland urban interface. Diverse stakeholders must collaborate to mitigate risk and adapt to changing conditions. Communication strategies in collaborative efforts may be most effective if they align with...
Author(s): Joel Hartter, Lawrence C. Hamilton, Mark J. Ducey, Angela Boag, Jonathan D. Salerno, Nils D. Christoffersen, Paul T. Oester, Michael W. Palace, Forrest R. Stevens
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Globally accelerating frequency and extent of wildfire threatens the persistence of specialist wildlife species through direct loss of habitat and indirect facilitation of exotic invasive species. Habitat specialists may be especially prone to rapidly changing environmental conditions because their ability to adapt lags behind the...
Author(s): Shawn T. O'Neil, Peter S. Coates, Brianne E. Brussee, Mark A. Ricca, Shawn Espinosa, Scott C. Gardner, David J. Delehanty
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Questions: Increased wildfire activity is resulting in plant community‐type conversions worldwide. In some regions, fire‐sensitive forests are being replaced by flammable fire‐resilient communities, increasing the likelihood of reburning due to positive fire feedbacks. Here we evaluated whether fire severity affects postfire plant...
Author(s): Jennifer B. Landesmann, Florencia Tiribelli, Juan Paritsis, Thomas T. Veblen, Thomas Kitzberger
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
1. Fire is a powerful ecological and evolutionary force that regulates organismal traits, population sizes, species interactions, community composition, carbon and nutrient cycling, and ecosystem function. It also presents a rapidly growing societal challenge, due to both increasingly destructive wildfires and fire exclusion in fire...
Author(s): Kendra K. McLauchlan, Philip E. Higuera, Jessica R. Miesel, Brendan M. Rogers, Jennifer A. Schweitzer, Jacquelyn Kremper Shuman, Alan J. Tepley, J. Morgan Varner, Thomas T. Veblen, Solny A. Adalsteinsson, Jennifer Balch, Enric Batllori, Erica R. Bigio, Paulo M. Brando, Megan E. Cattau, Janice L. Coen, Raelene M. Crandall, Lori D. Daniels, Neal J. Enright, Wendy S. Gross, Brian J. Harvey, Jeff A. Hatten, Sharon M. Hermann, Rebecca E. Hewitt, Leda N. Kobziar, Jennifer B. Landesmann, Michael M. Loranty, S. Yoshi Maezumi, Linda Mearns, Max A. Moritz, Jonathan A. Myers, Juli G. Pausas, Adam F. A. Pellegrini, William J. Platt, Jennifer Roozeboom, Hugh Safford, Fernanda Santos, Robert M. Scheller, Rosemary L. Sherriff, Kevin G. Smith, Melinda D. Smith, Adam C. Watts
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Synthesis
Researchers are increasingly examining patterns and drivers of postfire forest recovery amid growing concern that climate change and intensifying fires will trigger ecosystem transformations. Diminished seed availability and postfire drought have emerged as key constraints on conifer recruitment. However, the spatial and temporal...
Author(s): Caitlin E. Littlefield, Solomon Z. Dobrowski, John T. Abatzoglou, Sean A. Parks, Kimberley T. Davis
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfire is a ubiquitous disturbance agent in subalpine forests in western North America. Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia), a dominant tree species in these forests, is largely resilient to high-severity fires, but this resilience may be compromised under future scenarios of altered climate and fire activity. We...
Author(s): Barrie V. Chileen, Kendra K. McLauchlan, Philip E. Higuera, Meredith Parish, Bryan N. Shuman
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

Pages

XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).