Home
A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 3,600 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

334 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Fire is a dynamic ecological process in forests and impacts the carbon (C) cycle through direct combustion emissions, tree mortality, and by impairing the ability of surviving trees to sequester carbon. While studies on young trees have demonstrated that fire intensity is a determinant of post-fire net primary productivity, wildland...
Author(s): Aaron M. Sparks, Crystal A. Kolden, Alistair M. S. Smith, Luigi Boschetti, Daniel M. Johnson, Mark A. Cochrane
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
As climate change alters global fire regimes, fire and forest managers must prioritize management actions that simultaneously protect sensitive resources and allow fire to maintain its ecological role. Over the last twenty years, this task has become more difficult, as increased fire severity and season length have caused...
Author(s): Diana F. Tomback, Elizabeth R. Pansing
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Fire is a fundamental Earth system process and the primary ecosystem disturbance on the global scale. It affects carbon and water cycles through changing terrestrial ecosystems, and at the same time, is regulated by weather and climate, vegetation characteristics, and, importantly, human ignitions and suppression (i.e., the direct...
Author(s): Fang Li, David M. Lawrence, Ben Bond-Lamberty
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfire, climate and ecosystem are interactive components of the Earth system (Bowman et al 2009, Andela et al 2017). Climate and fuel moisture, which is heavily impacted by atmospheric conditions, are primary drivers for fire occurrence and behavior, while vegetation provides necessary fuels for combustion (Pyne et al 1996). On...
Author(s): Yongqiang Liu
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
People have inhabited the Northern Rocky Mountains of the United States since the close of the last Pleistocene glacial period, some 14,000 years B.P. (Fagan 1990; Meltzer 2009). Evidence of this ancient and more recent human occupation is found throughout the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USFS) Northern Region and...
Author(s): Carl M. Davis
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Climate Change and Rocky Mountain Ecosystems describes the results of a cutting-edge effort to assess climate change vulnerabilities and develop adaptation options for ecosystems in the Northern Rocky Mountains region of the United States, focusing on national forests, grasslands, and parks in Northern Idaho, Montana, North Dakota,...
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In many forested ecosystems, it is increasingly recognized that the probability of burning is substantially reduced within the footprint of previously burned areas. This self-limiting effect of wildland fire is considered a fundamental emergent property of ecosystems and is partly responsible for structuring landscape heterogeneity...
Author(s): Sean A. Parks, Marc-Andre Parisien, Carol Miller, Lisa M. Holsinger, Scott L. Baggett
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire refugia are landscape elements that remain unburned or minimally affected by fire, thereby supporting postfire ecosystem function, biodiversity, and resilience to disturbances. Although fire refugia have been studied across continents, scales, and affected taxa, they have not been characterized systematically over space and...
Author(s): Arjan J. H. Meddens, Crystal A. Kolden, James A. Lutz, Alistair M. S. Smith, C. Alina Cansler, John T. Abatzoglou, Garrett W. Meigs, William M. Downing, Meg A. Krawchuk
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Outdoor recreation is an important benefit provided by Federally managed and other public lands throughout the Rocky Mountains. National forests in the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USFS) Northern Region and Greater Yellowstone Area (a region hereafter called the Northern Rockies region) have an estimated 13.3...
Author(s): Michael S. Hand, Megan Lawson
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Building resilience to natural disturbances is a key to managing forests for adaptation to climate change. To date, most climate adaptation guidance has focused on recommendations for frequent‐fire forests, leaving few published guidelines for forests that naturally experience infrequent, stand‐replacing wildfires. Because most such...
Author(s): Joshua S. Halofsky, Daniel C. Donato, Jerry F. Franklin, Jessica E. Halofsky, David L. Peterson, Brian J. Harvey
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

Pages

XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).