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Monitoring changes in Greater Yellowstone Lake water quality following the 1988 wildfires

Author(s): R. G. Lathrop, John D. Vande Castle, James A. Brass
Year Published: 1994
Description:

The fires that burned the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) during the summer of 1988 were the largest ever recorded for the region. Wildfire can have profound indirect effects on associated aquatic ecosystems by increased nutrient loading, sediment, erosion, and runoff. Satellite remote sensing and water quality sampling were used to compare pre- versus post-fire conditions in the GYA's large oliotrophic (high transparency, low productivity) lakes. Inputs of suspended sediment to Jackson Lake appear to have increased. Yellowstone Lake has not shown any discernable shift in water quality. The insights gained separately from the Landsat Thematic and NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) remote sensing systems, along with conventional in-situ sampling, can be combined into a useful water quality monitoring tool.

Citation: Lathrop RG, Vande Castle JD, and Brass JA. 1994. Monitoring changes in Greater Yellowstone Lake water quality following the 1988 wildfires. Geocarto International 9(3): 49-57. DOI: 10.1080/10106049409354459
Topic(s): Fire Effects, Ecological - Second Order, Water
Ecosystem(s): None
Document Type: Book or Chapter or Journal Article
NRFSN number: 18578
Record updated: Nov 26, 2018