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Administrative and judicial review of NEPA decisions: risk factors and risk minimizing strategies for the Forest Service

Author(s): Audrey Bixler, R. Patrick Bixler, Autumn Ellison, Cassandra Moseley
Year Published: 2016
Description:

Changes in land use and management practices throughout the past century–in addition to drought and other stressors exacerbated by climate change–have degraded the nation’s forests and led to overgrowth and accumulation of hazardous fuels (GAO 2015). Because of these fuels, some forests now see high-severity fires that threaten communities as well as important natural and cultural resources. Restoring desired vegetation conditions, which can often be accomplished through mechanical thinning or prescribed burning, are central objectives of restoration and fuel reduction projects carried out by federal land management agencies. However, prior to implementing restoration projects or any other major action that may result in a significant impact on the environment, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 requires federal land management agencies to conduct an environmental analysis to consider and fully disclose potential impacts (42 USC § 4332(C)).

Citation: Bixler, A.; Bixler, R.P.; Ellison, A.; Moseley, C. 2016. Administrative and judicial review of NEPA decisions: risk factors and risk minimizing strategies for the Forest Service. Northwest Fire Science Consortium Literature Review No. 66. 48 p.
Topic(s): Management Approaches, National Environmental Policy and Review Act (EPA)
Ecosystem(s): None
Document Type: Synthesis
NRFSN number: 14463
Record updated: Jun 22, 2016