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Fire damage on extensively vs. intensively managed forest stands within the North Fork Fire, 1988

Author(s): Philip N. Omi, Kostas D. Kalabokidis
Year Published: 1991
Description:

The Greater Yellowstone fires of 1988 provide an opportunity to study important distinctions between lands managed for preservation versus multiple uses. We surveyed fuel loadings, fire severity, and fire damage to extensively managed, mature forest and to intensively managed, clearcut reproduction areas. Unburned, mature forests support higher fuel loadings in the large and small woody fuel size classes. Fifty percent of the 50 fire severity estimates in mature forest plots were given the highest ratings possible for flame length and ground char. Fire damage was rated highest on 89% of the 55 mature forest plots, based primarily on crown scorch indicators. By contrast, highest fire damage ratings were associated with only 20% of the 45 regeneration sites surveyed. Fire severity and damage were moderated in intensively managed areas. Intensively managed forest areas improve fire management options in the Greater Yellowstone Area.

Citation: Omi, Philip N.; Kalabokidis, Kostas D. 1991. Fire damage on extensively vs. intensively managed forest stands within the North Fork Fire, 1988. Northwest Science. 65(4):149-157.
Topic(s): Fire Effects, Ecological - First Order, Fire Intensity / Burn Severity, Ecological - Second Order, Vegetation, Fire Regime
Ecosystem(s): Subalpine wet spruce-fir forest, Subalpine dry spruce-fir forest, Montane wet mixed-conifer forest, Montane dry mixed-conifer forest
Document Type: Book or Chapter or Journal Article
NRFSN number: 8342
FRAMES RCS number: 13226
Record updated: May 10, 2018