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The legacy of a severe wildfire on stream nitrogen and carbon in headwater catchments

Author(s): Charles C. Rhoades, Alex T. Chow, Tim Covino, Timothy S. Fegel, Derek N. Pierson, Allison E. Rhea
Year Published: 2018
Description:

Large, high-severity wildfires alter the physical and biological conditions that determine how catchments retain and release nutrients and regulate streamwater quality. The short-term water quality impacts of severe wildfire are often dramatic, but the longer-term responses may better reflect terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem recovery. We followed streamwater chemistry for 14 years after the largest fire in recorded Colorado history, the 2002 Hayman Fire, to characterize patterns in nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) export.

Citation: Rhoades, Charles C.; Chow, Alex T.; Covino, Timothy P.; Fegel, Timothy S.; Pierson, Derek N.; Rhea, Allison E. 2018. The legacy of a severe wildfire on stream nitrogen and carbon in headwater catchments. Ecosystems. doi: 10.1007/s10021-018-0293-6.
Topic(s): Fire Effects, Ecological - Second Order, Water
Ecosystem(s): None
Document Type: Book or Chapter or Journal Article
NRFSN number: 18166
Record updated: Sep 26, 2018