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Where do animals come from during post‐fire population recovery? Implications for ecological and genetic patterns in post‐fire landscapes

Author(s): Sam C. Banks, Lachlan McBurney, David Blair, Ian D. Davies, David B. Lindenmayer
Year Published: 2016
Description:

Identifying where animals come from during population recovery can help to understand the impacts of disturbance events and regimes on species distributions and genetic diversity. Alternative recovery processes for animal populations affected by fire include external recolonization, nucleated recovery from refuges, or in situ survival and population growth. We used simulations to develop hypotheses about ecological and genetic patterns corresponding to these alternative models. We tested these hypotheses in a study of the recovery of two small mammals, the Australian bush rat and the agile antechinus, after a large (> 50 000 ha), severe wildfire.

Our study shows how the initial distribution of survivors, determined by fire effects on resource distribution, determines the subsequent scaling of population recovery patterns, and the sensitivity of population distribution and genetic diversity to changing disturbance regimes.

Citation: Banks SC, McBurney L, Blair D, Davies ID, Lindenmayer DB. 2016. Where do animals come from during post‐fire population recovery? Implications for ecological and genetic patterns in post‐fire landscapes. Ecography 40 (11): 1325-1338. https://doi.org/10.1111/ecog.02251
Topic(s): Fire Effects, Ecological - Second Order, Wildlife, Fire & Wildlife, Mammals, Rodents, Post-fire Management
Ecosystem(s): None
Document Type: Book or Chapter or Journal Article
NRFSN number: 17232
Record updated: Mar 29, 2018