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Resistance to invasives and altered fire regimes differs between cold and hot desert shrublands

Author(s): Matthew L. Brooks, Jeanne C. Chambers
Year Published: 2013
Description:

Settlement by Anglo-Americans in the desert shrublands of North America has resulted in the introduction and subsequent invasion of multiple nonnative invasive grass species. These invasions have altered pre-settlement fire regimes, converted native perennial shrublands to nonnative annual grasslands, and placed many native desert species at risk. Effective management of desert shrublands relies on a clear understanding of the threats posed by invasive plants and altered fire regimes, mechanism by which they cause undesirable impacts, and management strategies that can prevent or otherwise mitigate their negative effects.

Citation: Brooks, Matthew L.; Chambers, Jeanne C. 2013. Resistance to invasives and altered fire regimes differs between cold and hot desert shrublands. Rangeland Ecology & Management. 64: 431-438.
Topic(s): Fire Ecology, Invasive Species, Fire Effects, Ecological - Second Order
Ecosystem(s): None
Document Type: Book or Chapter or Journal Article
NRFSN number: 12136
FRAMES RCS number: 15325
Record updated: May 24, 2018