Home
A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Bromus tectorum expansion and biodiversity loss on the Snake River Plain, southern Idaho, U.S.A.

Author(s): Nancy L. Shaw, Victoria A. Saab, Stephen B. Monsen, T. D. Rich
Year Published: 1999
Description:

The Snake River Plain forms a 6 million ha arc-shaped depression across southern Idaho. Basalt flows, fresh water sediments, loess and volcanic deposits cover its surface. Elevation increases eastward from 650 to 2,150 m altitude. Climate is semi-arid with annual precipitation ranging from 150 to 400 mm, arriving primarily in winter and spring. Native shrub steppe vegetation is dominated by Artemisia tridentata (big sagebrush) and bunchgrasses, e.g. Pseudoregneria spicatum (bluebunch wheatgrass), Elymus (wildrye) and Poa (bluegrass) spp., with interspersed Purshia tridentata (antelope bitterbrush) and Pseudoregneria spicatum communities. Salt desert shrub communities, e.g. Atriplex spp. (saltbush), Ceratoides lanata (winterfat), occupy drier areas.

Citation: Shaw, N.L.; Saab, V.A.; Monsen, S.B.; Rich, T.D. 1999. Bromus tectorum expansion and biodiversity loss on the Snake River Plain, southern Idaho, U.S.A. In: Eldridge, D.; Freudenberger, D., eds. People and Rangelands building the future, proceedings of the 6th International Rangeland Congress; 1999 July 19-23; Townsville, Australia. p. 586-588.
Topic(s): Fire Ecology, Invasive Species, Fire Effects, Ecological - Second Order
Ecosystem(s): Sagebrush steppe
Document Type: Conference Proceedings
NRFSN number: 11420
FRAMES RCS number: 6887
Record updated: May 24, 2018