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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,000 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

4580 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Destructive flash floods and debris flows are a common menace following wildfire. The restoration of protection provided by forests from post-fire floods and debris flows depends on the recovery of infiltration and attendant reduction of infiltration-excess surface runoff generation. This work examines seven years of post-fire...
Author(s): Brian A. Ebel
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Continuing long and extensive wildfire seasons in the Western US emphasize the need for better understanding of wildfire impacts including post‐fire management scenarios. Advancements in our understanding of post‐fire hillslope erosion and watershed response such as flooding, sediment yield, and debris flows have recently received...
Author(s): Peter R. Robichaud, Sarah A. Lewis, Robert E. Brown, Edwin D. Bone, Erin S. Brooks
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire is a global disturbance that is predicted to increase in frequency and severity in many parts of the world due to climate change. Biological soil crust (biocrust) communities are often overlooked in fire studies despite having a substantial effect on ecological function and the adjacent communities. The goal of this study is to...
Author(s): Brianne Palmer, Rebecca Hernandez, David Lipson
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The Lion Fire 2011 (LF11) and Lion Fire 2017 (LF17) were similar in size, location, and smoke transport. The same locations were used to monitor both fires for ground level fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Ground level PM2.5 is used to determine the relative smoke exposure from fire management tactics used during LF11 and LF17. The...
Author(s): Don Schweizer, Ricardo Cisneros, Kathleen M. Navarro
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Background tree mortality is a complex process that requires large sample sizes and long timescales to disentangle the suite of ecological factors that collectively contribute to tree stress, decline, and eventual mortality. Tree mortality associated with acute disturbance events, in contrast, is conspicuous and frequently studied,...
Author(s): Tucker J. Furniss, Andrew J. Larson, Van R. Kane, James A. Lutz
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
This work reports characteristics of embers generated by torching trees and seeks to identify the important physical and biological factors involved. The size of embers, number flux and propensity to ignite spot fires (i.e. number flux of ‘hot’ embers) are reported for several tree species under different combinations of number (one...
Author(s): Tyler R. Hudson, Ryan B. Bray, David L. Blunck, Wesley G. Page, Bret W. Butler
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Seeding an area after a fire has long been used to control erosion and suppress problem invasive grasses like cheatgrass. But for managers, choosing the right seed mix to use can be tricky. Seed mixes containing only native species are ideal for areas where natural vegetation recovery is a long-term objective, but there is a...
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Because wildfires don’t stop at ownership boundaries, managers from governmental and nongovernmental organizations in Northern Colorado are taking steps to pro-actively “co-manage” wildfire risk through the Northern Colorado Fireshed Collaborative (NCFC).For this research project, co-management refers to the collective actions taken...
Author(s): Tony S. Cheng, Michael D. Caggiano
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Restoration of non-sprouting shrubs after wildfire is increasingly becoming a management priority. In the western U.S., Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) restoration is a high priority, but sagebrush establishment from seed is sporadic. In contrast, planting seedlings often...
Author(s): Kirk W. Davies, Jonathan D. Bates, Chad S. Boyd
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Extreme wildfire events are becoming more common and while the immediate risks of particulate exposures to susceptible populations (i.e., elderly, asthmatics) are appreciated, the long-term health effects are not known. In 2017, the Seeley Lake (SL), MT area experienced unprecedented levels of wildfire smoke from July 31 to...
Author(s): Ava Orr, Cristi A. L. Migliaccio, Mary Buford, Sarah Ballou, Christopher T. Migliaccio
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).