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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

906 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Hand-constructed piles in eastern Washington and north-central New Mexico were weighed periodically between October 2011 and June 2015 to develop decay-rate constants that are useful for estimating the rate of piled biomass loss over time. Decay-rate constants (k) were determined by fitting negative exponential curves to time series...
Author(s): Clinton S. Wright, Alexander M. Evans, Joseph C. Restaino
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Fire may remove or create dead wood aboveground, but it is less clear how high severity burning of soils affects belowground microbial communities and soil processes, and for how long. In this study, we investigated soil fungal and bacterial communities and biogeochemical responses of severely burned “red” soil and less severely...
Author(s): Jane E. Smith, Laurel A. Kluber, Tara N. Jennings, Donaraye McKay, Greg Brenner, Elizabeth W. Sulzman
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Restoration treatments in dry forests of the western US often attempt silvicultural practices to restore the historical characteristics of forest structure and fire behavior. However, it is suggested that a reliance on non-spatial metrics of forest stand structure, along with the use of wildland fire behavior models that lack the...
Author(s): J. Ziegler, Chad M. Hoffman, Michael A. Battaglia, William E. Mell
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Recent studies have highlighted the potential of linking fire behaviour to plant ecophysiology as an improved route to characterising severity, but research to date has been limited to laboratory-scale investigations. Fine-scale fire behaviour during prescribed fires has been identified as a strong predictor of post-fire tree...
Author(s): Aaron M. Sparks, Alistair M. S. Smith, Alan F. Talhelm, Crystal A. Kolden, Kara M. Yedinak, Daniel M. Johnson
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Prescribed fire is applied widely as a management tool in North America to meet various objectives such as reducing fuel loads and fuel continuity, returning fire to an ecosystem, enhancing wildlife habitats, improving forage, preparing seedbeds, improving watershed conditions, enhancing nutrient cycling, ...
Author(s): William M. Block, L. Mike Conner, Paul A. Brewer, Paulette Ford, Jonathan Haufler, Andrea Litt, Ronald E. Masters, Laura R. Mitchell, Jane Park
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Ash plays an important role in controlling runoff and erosion processes after wildfire and has frequently been hypothesised to clog soil pores and reduce infiltration. Yet evidence for clogging is incomplete, as research has focussed on identifying the presence of ash in soil; the actual flow processes remain unknown. We conducted...
Author(s): Cathelijine Stoof, Anouk I. Gevaert, Christine Baver, Bahareh Hassanpour, Veronica L. Morales, Wei Zhang, Deborah A. Martin, Shree K. Giri, Tammo S. Steenhuis
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The pine forests in the southern portion of the Rocky Mountains are a heterogeneous mosaic of disturbance and recovery. The most extensive and intensive stress and mortality are received from human activity, fire, and mountain pine beetles (MPB; Dendroctonus ponderosae). Understanding disturbance interactions and disturbance-...
Author(s): Lu Liang, Todd J. Hawbaker, Zhiliang Zhu, Xuecao Li, Peng Gong
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Recently, wildfires and prescribed burning have become more frequent in conifer forests of western North America. Most studies examining the impacts of insects on trees with post-fire injury have focused on contributions to tree mortality. Few studies have examined fire-caused injuries to estimate the probability of attack by...
Author(s): Jose F. Negron, Joel D. McMillin, Carolyn Hull Sieg, James F. Fowler, Kurt K. Allen, Linda L. Wadleigh, John A. Anhold, Ken E. Gibson
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire severity maps are an important tool for understanding fire effects on a landscape. The relative differenced normalized burn ratio (RdNBR) is a commonly used severity index in California forests, and is typically divided into four categories: unchanged, low, moderate, and high. RdNBR is often calculated twice—from images...
Author(s): Jamie M. Lydersen, Brandon M. Collins, Jay D. Miller, Danny L. Fry, Scott L. Stephens
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Post-fire forest management commonly requires accepting some negative ecological impacts from management activities in order to achieve management objectives. Managers need to know, however, whether ecological impacts from post-fire management activities are transient or cause long-term ecosystem degradation. We studied the long-...
Author(s): David W. Peterson, Erich K. Dodson
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).