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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 2,900 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

689 results

Changes in the properties of an ash layer with time may affect the amount of post-fire runoff, particularly by the formation of ash surface crusts. The formation of depositional crusts by ash have been observed at the pore and plot scales, but the causes and temporal evolution of ash layers and associated crusts have not yet been...
Author(s): Victoria N. Balfour, Stefan H. Doerr, Peter R. Robichaud
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Citizens, government officials, and natural resource managers are greatly concerned about potential impacts of the mountain pine beetle (MPB) epidemic on fire hazards and risk. Some mountain towns are surrounded by dead and dying trees. In the Rocky Mountain Region of the Forest Service, the MPB epidemic threatens over 250,000 acres...
Author(s): Russell A. Parsons, William Matt Jolly, Paul G. Langowski, Megan Matonis, I. Sue Miller
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
The Future Forest Webinar Series facilitated dialogue between scientists and managers about the challenges and opportunities created by the mountain pine beetle (MPB) epidemic. The series consisted of six webinar facilitated by the USFS Rocky Mountain Research Station, the Northern and Rocky Mountain Regions, and the Colorado Forest...
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
Both satellite imagery and spatial fire effects models are valuable tools for generating burn severity maps that are useful to fire scientists and resource managers. The purpose of this study was to test a new mapping approach that integrates imagery and modeling to create more accurate burn severity maps. We developed and assessed...
Author(s): Eva C. Karau, Pamela G. Sikkink, Robert E. Keane, Gregory K. Dillon
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The transformation of fuels resulting from the mountain pine beetle epidemic is unprecedented in its large geographic extent and the rapid pace of the transformation. This paper describes a proposed fire risk and hazard characterization system, as well as methodology for locating certain stand types on the landscape.
Author(s): Robert W. Gray
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Widespread outbreaks of the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) in the lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud. var. latifolia Engelm.) forests of North America have produced stands with significant levels of recent tree mortality. The needle foliage from recently attacked trees typically turns red within...
Author(s): Wesley G. Page, Michael J. Jenkins, Martin E. Alexander
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Understanding how disturbances interact to shape ecosystems is a key challenge in ecology. In forests of western North America, the degree to which recent bark beetle outbreaks and subsequent fires may be linked (e.g., outbreak severity affects fire severity) and/or whether these two disturbances produce compound effects on postfire...
Author(s): Brian J. Harvey, Daniel C. Donato, William H. Romme, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) is in serious decline across its range, largely due to the combined effects of Cronartium ribicola J. C. Fisch (an introduced fungal pathogen that causes white pine blister rust), replacement by late successional species, and widespread infestation of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus...
Author(s): Lauren Fins, Ben Hoppus
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
In many U.S. federally designated wilderness areas, wildfires are likely to burn of their own accord due to favorable management policies and remote location. Previous research suggested that limitations on fire size can result from the evolution of natural fire regimes, specifically in places where fuels were...
Author(s): Sandra L. Haire, Kevin McGarigal, Carol Miller
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The Western Mountain Initiative (WMI), a consortium of research groups in the Western United States, focuses on understanding and predicting responses-especially sensitivities, thresholds, resistance, and resilience-of mountain ecosystems to climatic variability and change (Peterson et al. 2012). The WMI addresses how climatic...
Author(s): Crystal L. Raymond
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Synthesis, Technical Report or White Paper

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XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).