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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

638 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Freshwater ecosystems are warming globally from the direct effects of climate change on air temperature and hydrology and the indirect effects on near-stream vegetation. In fire-prone landscapes, vegetative change may be especially rapid and cause significant local stream temperature increases but the importance of these increases...
Author(s): Lisa M. Holsinger, Robert E. Keane, Daniel J. Isaak, Lisa A. Eby, Michael K. Young
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Changes in the properties of an ash layer with time may affect the amount of post-fire runoff, particularly by the formation of ash surface crusts. The formation of depositional crusts by ash have been observed at the pore and plot scales, but the causes and temporal evolution of ash layers and associated crusts have not yet been...
Author(s): Victoria N. Balfour, Stefan H. Doerr, Peter R. Robichaud
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildland fire is an important natural process in many ecosystems. However, fire exclusion has reduced frequency of fire and area burned in many dry forest types, which may affect vegetation structure and composition, and potential fire behavior. In forests of the western U.S., these effects pose a challenge for fire and land...
Author(s): Sean A. Parks, Carol Miller, Cara R. Nelson, Zachary A. Holden
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The Future Forest Webinar Series facilitated dialogue between scientists and managers about the challenges and opportunities created by the mountain pine beetle (MPB) epidemic. The series consisted of six webinar facilitated by the USFS Rocky Mountain Research Station, the Northern and Rocky Mountain Regions, and the Colorado Forest...
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
Wildland fires often cause extreme changes in the landscape that drastically influence surface runoff and soil erosion, which can impact forest resources, aquatic habitats, water supplies, public safety, and forest access infrastructure such as forest roads. Little information is available on the effectiveness of various post-fire...
Author(s): Randy B. Foltz, Peter R. Robichaud
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Western larch is one of the most fire-adapted conifers in western North America. Its historical perpetuation depended upon regular fire disturbances, which creates open stand conditions and mineral seedbeds. A stand of 200- to 500-year-old larch in western Montana with deep duff mounds resulting from an unusually long 150-year fire-...
Author(s): Michael G. Harrington
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
We tested whether reduced parasite loads might contribute to high post-fire abundances of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). We performed parasite examinations of 54 mice captured in burned forest in the area of Davis Fire (western Montana, USA), and 26 mice captured in nearby unburned forest. Mean abundance of ectoparasites (fleas...
Author(s): Rafal Zwolak, S. Meagher, J. W. Vaughn, S. Dziemian, Elizabeth E. Crone
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Recent bark beetle outbreaks have had a significant impact on forests throughout western North America and have generated concerns about interactions and feedbacks between beetle attacks and fire. However, research has been hindered by a lack of experimental studies and the use of fire behavior models incapable of accounting for the...
Author(s): Chad M. Hoffman, Penelope Morgan, William E. Mell, Russell A. Parsons, Eva K. Strand, Stephen Cook
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Land managers of the northern Rocky Mountains and south-central U.S. are challenged with numerous social and ecological changes, many of which are linked to climate change. The work presented here focuses on two important research gaps: 1) managers do not understand public opinions toward smoke from prescribed fires (a necessary...
Author(s): Jarod Blades
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Dissertation or Thesis
Thinning is a common silvicultural treatment being widely used to restore different types of overstocked forest stands in western U.S. because of its effect on changing fire behavior. Typically, thinning is applied at the stand level using prescriptions derived from sample plots that ignore variability in tree sizes and location...
Author(s): Marco A. Contreras, Woodam Chung
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).