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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 3,600 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

1557 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

This guide was developed to help identify Culturally Peeled Trees. Culturally Peeled Trees are a specific type of Culturally Modified Tree. The term is used to describe the mostly pre-reservation practice by aboriginal or native people of 'peeling,' or removing, the bark/cambium layer of a tree for a variety of procurement and...
Author(s): Marcy Reiser, Laurie S. Huckaby
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Do large fire “runs” consistently result in high severity fires? What are the trends in proportion burned severely? Do climate, vegetation and topography influence burn severity in the same way that they affect area burned? How do severe fire disturbances influence vegetation response? I draw on recent and ongoing work to...
Type: Media : Webinar
Fire.org is the home page of Systems for Environmental Management, a Montana nonprofit research and educational corporation. For over 29 years we've specialized in issues concerning wildland fire planning, behavior, fuel, weather, and effects. Here we post many of the publications and software packages we've developed in cooperation...
Type: Website : Website
FOFEM is a computer program for predicting first order fire effects including tree mortality, fuel consumption, smoke production, and soil heating caused by prescribed fire or wildfire. In this webinar you will learn about the FOFEM algorithms, how to prepare the input data, run the tool and interpret outputs. This webinar was...
Type: Media : Webinar
During the summer of 2013 over 1000 wildfires burned throughout Colorado totaling almost 200,000 acres. One of these, the West Fork Fire Complex, burned through the beetle-killed forests of the Upper Rio Grande and San Juan National Forests in southern Colorado. While other fires in the state drew national attention due to proximity...
Type: Media : Webinar
This session will provide an overview of the Global Wildfire Information System (GWIS) and a hands-on demonstration on the use of the GWIS viewer. GWIS is an online web application that uses remotely sensed wildfire data. This data includes fire danger, wildfire locations, burned area extent, and burn severity. GWIS also focuses on...
Type: Media : Webinar
The ecological effects of wildland fire – also termed the fire severity – are often highly heterogeneous in space and time. This heterogeneity is a result of spatial variability in factors such as fuel, topography, and climate (e.g. a map of mean annual temperature). However, temporally variable factors such as daily weather and...
Type: Media : Webinar

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XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).