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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,800 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

1977 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Exotic annual grass invasion and dominance of rangelands is a concern across western North America and other semiarid and arid ecosystems around the world. Postfire invasion and dominance by exotic annual grasses in sagebrush communities is especially problematic as there are no cost-effective control strategies available for the...
Author(s): Kirk W. Davies, Jonathan D. Bates, Barry Perryman, Sergio Arispe
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Understanding tree physiological responses to fire is needed to accurately model post‐fire carbon processes and inform management decisions. Given trees can die immediately or at extended time periods after fire, we combined two experiments to assess the short‐ (one‐day) and long‐term (21‐months) fire effects on Pinus ponderosa...
Author(s): Raquel Partelli Feltrin, Alistair M. S. Smith, Henry D. Adams, Crystal A. Kolden, Daniel M. Johnson
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The dead foliage of scorched crowns is one of the most conspicuous signatures of wildland fires. Globally, crown scorch from fires in savannas, woodlands, and forests causes tree stress and death across diverse taxa. The term crown scorch, however, is inconsistently and ambiguously defined in the literature, causing confusion and...
Author(s): J. Morgan Varner, Sharon M. Hood, Doug P. Aubrey, Kara M. Yedinak, J. Kevin Hiers, William Matt Jolly, Timothy M. Shearman, Jennifer K. McDaniel, Joseph J. O'Brien, Eric Rowell
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Projected warming of global surface air temperatures will further exacerbate droughts, wildfires, and other agents of ecosystem stress. We use latewood blue intensity from high‐elevation Picea engelmannii to reconstruct late‐summer maximum air temperature for the Greater Yellowstone Ecoregion (GYE) spanning 770-2019 CE. Using a...
Author(s): Karen J. Heeter, Maegen L. Rochner, Grant Harley
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Restoration of fire-prone forests is a common practice intended to increase resilience to wildfire, drought, and bark beetles. However, the long-term effects of restoration treatments on understory species, particularly non-native species, are poorly understood. We investigated long-term (23 years) effects of restoration treatments...
Author(s): Woongsoon Jang, Justin S. Crotteau, Yvette K. Ortega, Sharon M. Hood, Christopher R. Keyes, Dean E. Pearson, Duncan C. Lutes, Anna Sala
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfire is a landscape‐scale disturbance that changes the rate and magnitude of many earth surface processes. The impacts of fire on earth surface processes can vary substantially from place to place depending on a variety of site‐specific conditions, including topography, fire severity, regional climate, vegetation type, and soil...
Author(s): Francis K. Rengers, Luke A. McGuire
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Due to the shifting global climate, the frequency and severity of disturbances are increasing, inevitably causing an increase in disturbances overlapping in time and space. Bark beetle epidemics and wildfires have historically shaped the disturbance regimes of Western North American forests. Their interactive effects on stand...
Author(s): Zoe Schapira, Camille Stevens-Rumann, Donna Shorrock, Chad M. Hoffman, Amy Chambers
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Because fire retardant can enter streams and harm aquatic species including endangered fish, agencies such as the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) must estimate the downstream extent of toxic effects every time fire retardant enters streams (denoted as an “intrusion”). A challenge in estimating the length of stream affected by the...
Author(s): Chris R. Rehmann, P. Ryan Jackson, Holly J. Puglis
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Subalpine forests that historically burned every 100–300 yr are expected to burn more frequently as climate warms, perhaps before trees reach reproductive maturity or produce a serotinous seedbank. Tree regeneration after short‐interval (<30‐yr) high‐severity fire will increasingly rely on seed dispersal from unburned trees, but...
Author(s): Nathan S. Gill, Tyler J. Hoecker, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The acute stress response is a cornerstone of animal behavior research, but little is currently understood about how responses to acute stressors (i.e. discrete noxious stimuli) may be altered in future climates. As climate change ensues, animals may experience chronic stress due to persistent warmer temperatures and environmental...
Author(s): Camdon B. Kay, David J. Delehanty, Devaleena S. Pradhan, Joshua B. Grinath
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).