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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 3,600 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

93 results



Adverse weather conditions and topographic influences are suspected to be responsible for most entrapments of firefighters in Australia. A lack of temporally and spatially coherent set of data however, hinders a clear understanding of the contribution of each weather type or terrain driver on these events. We investigate coronial...
Author(s): Sébastien Lahaye, J. Sharples, Stuart Matthews, Simon Heemstra, Owen F. Price, Rachel Badlan
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildland firefighters perform physical work while being subjected to multiple stressors and adverse, volatile working environments for extended periods. Recent research has highlighted sleep as a significant and potentially modifiable factor impacting operational performance. The aim of this review was to (1) examine the existing...
Author(s): Grace E. Vincent, Brad Aisbett, Alexander Wolkow, Sarah M. Jay, Nicola D. Ridgers, Sally A. Ferguson
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildland firefighters suppressing wildland fires or conducting prescribed fires work long shifts during which they are exposed to high levels of wood smoke with no respiratory protection. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are hazardous air pollutants formed during incomplete combustion. Exposure to PAHs was measured for 21...
Author(s): Kathleen M. Navarro, Ricardo Cisneros, Elizabeth M. Noth, John R. Balmes, Katharine Hammond
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Escape routes are essential components of wildland firefighter safety, providing pre-defined pathways to a safety zone. Among the many factors that affect travel rates along an escape route, landscape conditions such as slope, lowlying vegetation density, and ground surface roughness are particularly influential, and can be measured...
Author(s): Michael J. Campbell, Philip E. Dennison, Bret W. Butler
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildland fire smoke is a complex mixture of air contaminants that have the potential cause adverse health effects. Individuals can be exposed occupationally if they work as wildland firefighters or public exposure from ambient air that is contaminated with smoke from a nearby or distant wildland fire. Previous studies of public...
Author(s): Joe Domitrovich, George Broyles, Roger D. Ottmar, Timothy E. Reinhardt, Luke P. Naeher, Michael T. Kleinman, Kathleen M. Navarro, Christopher E. Mackay, Olorunfemi Adetona
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Wildland firefighters suppressing wildland fires or conducting prescribed fires work long shifts and are exposed to high levels of smoke with no respiratory protection. Inhalation of smoke is a safety concern for wildland firefighters and can potentially impair their performance and cause short and long term health impacts.
Author(s): Kathleen M. Navarro, Stacey S. Frederick
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Wildfire evacuation trigger points are prominent geographic features (e.g., ridge lines, rivers, and roads) utilized in timing evacuation warnings. When a fire crosses a feature, an evacuation warning is issued to the communities or firefighters in the path of the fire. Current methods for generating trigger buffers have limited...
Author(s): Dapeng Li, Thomas J. Cova, Philip E. Dennison
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
On the afternoon of Aug. 29, 1985, the Butte Fire on the Salmon National Forest in central Idaho made a sudden high-intensity crown run up Wallace Creek, a side drainage of the Salmon River. Over the next 90 minutes, this run consumed 3,500 acres. Approximately 118 persons on the Division—including hand crews,...
Author(s): David Thomas
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
The Forest Service has declared its intention of becoming a learning organization. As a means to that end, the Forest Service has borrowed and adapted the staff ride concept from the military. This paper describes the staff ride product and compares it to what scientific research tells us about the nature of learning. Focus group...
Author(s): Joseph R. Harris
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Dissertation or Thesis
Wildland firefighters are often called on to make tactical decisions under stressful conditions in order to suppress a fire. These decisions can be hindered by human factors such as insufficient knowledge of surroundings and conditions, lack of experience, overextension of resources or loss of situational awareness. One potential...
Author(s): Gregory K. Fryer, Philip E. Dennison, Thomas J. Cova
Year Published: 2013
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).