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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

101 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

This state-of-knowledge review about the effects of fire on flora and fuels can assist land managers with ecosystem and fire management planning and in their efforts to inform others about the ecological role of fire. Chapter topics include fire regime classification, autecological effects of fire, fire regime characteristics and...
Author(s): Timothy E. Paysen, R. James Ansley, James K. Brown, Gerald J. Gottfried, Sally M. Haase, Michael G. Harrington, Marcia G. Narog, Stephen S. Sackett, Ruth C. Wilson
Year Published: 2000
Type: Document : Synthesis, Technical Report or White Paper
A 17000 yr fire history from Yellowstone National Park demonstrates a strong link between changes in climate and variations in fire frequency on millennial time scales. The fire history reconstruction is based on a detailed charcoal stratigraphy from Cygnet Lake in the rhyolite plateau region. Macroscopic charcoal particles were...
Author(s): Sarah H. Millspaugh, Cathy L. Whitlock, Patrick J. Bartlein
Year Published: 2000
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire, competition for light and water, and native forest pests have interacted for millennia in western forests to produce a countryside dominated by seral species of conifers. These conifer-dominated ecosystems exist in six kinds of biotic communities. We divided one of these communities, the Rocky Mountain Montane Conifer Forest,...
Author(s): Geral I. McDonald, Alan E. Harvey, Jonalea R. Tonn
Year Published: 2000
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
Description not entered
Author(s): Stephen F. Arno
Year Published: 2000
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Fire has historically been an important ecological component of forests in the Intermountain Region of the northwestern United States. This study is set in a small biogeographically disjunct mountain range. Our research objectives were to (1) investigate the historical frequency, severity, size, and spatial pattern of fire; (2)...
Author(s): Michael P. Murray, Stephen C. Bunting, Penelope Morgan
Year Published: 1998
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Presents detailed age structure for two western larch stands that historically experienced frequent fires. Compares age structures of eleven ponderosa pine and western larch stands representing a broad range of sites that had frequent fires. lnterprets causal factors possibly linked to variations in stand age structures.
Author(s): Stephen F. Arno, Helen Y. Smith, Michael A. Krebs
Year Published: 1997
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
We are developing new management treatments for regenerating and sustaining lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests through emulation of natural disturbance processes. Lodgepole pine is the principal forest cover on over 26 million hectares in western North America. While infrequent, stand replacing fires following mountain pine...
Author(s): Colin C. Hardy, Ward W. McCaughey
Year Published: 1997
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Ecological research has implicated the practice of fire exclusion as a major contributor to forest health problems in the semiarid ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) zone of the Inland West (Mutch and others 1993; Sampson and others 1994). Prior to 1900, frequent, low-intensity fires occurred on upland forests in this forest zone at...
Author(s): Matthew K. Arno
Year Published: 1996
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Several decades of fire suppression following logging around the turn-of-the-century has produced dense, evenage stands of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). They contrast with the original forests where frequent, low-intensity fires gave rise to open, parklike, and often uneven-age stands of...
Author(s): Joe H. Scott
Year Published: 1996
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Elimination of the historic pattern of frequent low-intensity fires in ponderosa pine and pine-mixed conifer forests has resulted in major ecological disruptions. Prior to 1900, open stands of large, long-lived, fire-resistant ponderosa pine were typical. These were accompanied in some areas by other fire-dependent species such as...
Author(s): Stephen F. Arno
Year Published: 1996
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).