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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

101 results


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In subalpine forests of the northern Rocky Mountains, fire exclusion has contributed to large-scale shifts from early-successional whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) to late-successional subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.), a species assumed to be more shade tolerant than whitebark pine and with leaf to sapwood...
Author(s): Anna Sala, Elieen V. Carey, Robert E. Keane, Ragan M. Callaway
Year Published: 2001
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Changes in fire size, shape, and frequency under different fire-management strategies were evaluated using time series of fire perimeter data (fire atlases) and mapped potential vegetation types (PVTs) in the Gila-Aldo Leopold Wilderness Complex (GALWC) in New Mexico and the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness Complex (SBWC) in Idaho and...
Author(s): Matthew G. Rollins, Thomas W. Swetnam, Penelope Morgan
Year Published: 2001
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Present understanding of fire ecology in forests subject to surface fires is based on fire-scar evidence. We present theory and empirical results that suggest that fire-history data have uncertainties and biases when used to estimate the population mean fire interval (FI) or other parameters of the fire regime. First, the population...
Author(s): William L. Baker, Donna S. Ehle
Year Published: 2001
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Among the most pronounced vegetation changes in past 130 years has been the increase in both distribution and density of juniper (Juniperus spp.) and pinyon (Pinus spp.) across the Intermountain West. Juniper and pinyon species between the Canadian and Mexican borders occupy over 30 million ha throughout this region. Prior to...
Author(s): Richard F. Miller, Robin J. Tausch
Year Published: 2001
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
It is now widely acknowledged that frequent low-intensity fires once structured many western forests. What is not generally recognized, however, is that most of those fires were purposefully set by native people, not started by lightning. Data from the Rocky Mountains attest to the widespread use of fire by native people, as does...
Author(s): Charles E. Kay
Year Published: 2000
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
Projected changes in global climate have important ramifications for the future of national parks and other reserves set aside to conserve ecological uniqueness. We explored potential implications of climatic changes on lifeform distribution and growth at Wind Cave National Park (WCNP), South Dakota, which lies on a climatically...
Author(s): Dominique Bachelet, James M. Lenihan, Christopher Daly, Ronald P. Neilson
Year Published: 2000
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Some 100 years of fire exclusion in the Interior Northwest has resulted in riparian areas dominated by dense thickets of shade-tolerant trees. If former, more open conditions could be restored, these habitats could once more support a more diverse bird community. Efforts toward this at two study sites are described.
Author(s): Colin C. Hardy, Robert E. Keane, Michael G. Harrington
Year Published: 2000
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
Nitrogen fixing plants have been reported to play an important role in replacing N lost from soil in fire dominated ecosystems. Exclusion of fire from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.)-Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) forests of western Montana has lead to widespread changes in forest structure,...
Author(s): J. A. Newland, Thomas H. DeLuca
Year Published: 2000
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Pinus albicaulis (whitebark pine) is an important tree species in subalpine forests of the Northern Rocky Mountains. Populations have been declining at unprecedented rates due to the introduction of an exotic pathogen and fire suppression. We initiated this study to evaluate historical trends in Pinus albicaulis abundance along with...
Author(s): Michael P. Murray, Stephen C. Bunting, Michael P. Murray
Year Published: 2000
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Twentieth century fire patterns were analyzed for two large, disparate wilderness areas in the Rocky Mountains. Spatial and temporal patterns of fires were represented as GIS-based digital fire atlases compiled from archival Forest Service data. We find that spatial and temporal fire patterns are related to landscape features and...
Author(s): Matthew G. Rollins, Thomas W. Swetnam, Penelope Morgan
Year Published: 2000
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).