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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

101 results


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Author(s): Merrill R. Kaufmann, Kevin C. Ryan, Peter Z. Fule, William H. Romme
Year Published: 2005
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The complex topography of the inland northwestern U.S. (58.4 million ha) interacts with continental and maritime air masses to create a highly variable climate, which results in a variety of forest settings. Historically (1850 to 1900), approximately 20% of the area was covered by dry forests (Pinus ponderosa, Pseudotsuga menziesii...
Author(s): Theresa B. Jain, Russell T. Graham
Year Published: 2005
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Although fire consumes much of the forest floor, few studies have examined the change in forest floor characteristics with increasing time since fire. Mixed forests of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Doug. Ex. laws) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga mensizii (Mirb.) Franco) in the inland northwest once burned with greater frequency than...
Author(s): M. Derek MacKenzie, Thomas H. DeLuca, Anna Sala
Year Published: 2004
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Understanding the relative influence of fuels and climate on wildfires across the Rocky Mountains is necessary to predict how fires may respond to a changing climate and to define effective fuel management approaches to controlling wildfire in this increasingly populated region. The idea that decades of fire suppression have...
Author(s): Tania L. Schoennagel, Thomas T. Veblen, William H. Romme
Year Published: 2004
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
How have changes in land management practices affected vegetation patterns in the greater Yellowstone ecosystem? This question led us to develop a deterministic, successional, vegetation model to 'turn back the clock' on a study area and assess how patterns in vegetation cover type and structure have changed through different...
Author(s): Alisa L. Gallant, Andrew J. Hansen, John S. Councilman, Duane K. Monte, David W. Betz
Year Published: 2003
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire management addressing postfire erosion and aquatic ecosystems tends to focus on short-term effects persisting up to about a decade after fire. A longer perspective is important in understanding natural variability in postfire erosion and sedimentation, the role of these processes in structuring habitat, and future expectations...
Author(s): Grant A. Meyer, Jennifer L. Pierce
Year Published: 2003
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article, Synthesis
Fire-history data for ponderosa pine forests in the western U.S. have uncertainties and biases. Targeting multiple-scarred trees and using recorder trees when sampling for fire history may lead to incomplete records. For most of the western U.S., research is insufficient to conclude that high-severity fires did or did not occur in...
Author(s): William L. Baker, Donna S. Ehle
Year Published: 2003
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
Twentieth-century wildfire suppression and land management policies have promoted biomass accumulations in some ecosystems in the western United States where wildfire is a natural and necessary element. These changes have fueled large, stand-replacing crown fires in southwestern ponderosa pine forests, where they were rare under...
Author(s): Anthony L. Westerling, Thomas W. Swetnam
Year Published: 2003
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article, Synthesis
Topography, vegetation, and climate act together to determine the spatial patterns of fires at landscape scales. Knowledge of landscape-fire-climate relations at these broad scales (1,000s ha to 100,000s ha) is limited and is largely based on inferences and extrapolations from fire histories reconstructed from finer scales. In this...
Author(s): Matthew G. Rollins, Penelope Morgan
Year Published: 2002
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire played an important role in maintaining and creating conditions suitable for native flora and fauna in the forests of western North America. Recent coarse filter conservation strategies have advocated creating future landscapes that incorporate historic or natural ranges of variability, including fire regimes. Historic fire...
Author(s): James K. Agee
Year Published: 2002
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings, Technical Report or White Paper

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).