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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,800 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

1165 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Question: Northern peatlands are increasingly threatened by wildfire. Severe peatland wildfires can provide opportunities for new non-peatland species to colonise post-fire. Changes in plant colonisation could lead to longer-term shifts in community composition, compromising recovery of peatland structure and function. Understanding...
Author(s): Harry E. R. Shepherd, Jane A. Catford, Magda N. Steele, Marc G. Dumont, Robert T. E. Mills, Paul D.M. Hughes, Bjorn J. M. Robroek
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Computer models used to predict forest and fuels dynamics and wildfire behavior inform decisionmaking in contexts such as postdisturbance management. It is imperative to understand possible uncertainty in model predictions. We evaluated sensitivity of the Fire and Fuels Extension to the Forest Vegetation Simulator predictions to...
Author(s): Maureen C. Kennedy, Morris C. Johnson, Sarah C. Harrison
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
After fire, bark beetles pose a significant threat to trees. Resin duct characteristics in trees can increase resistance to bark beetles. However, little is known about how intra- and interspecific variations in resin ducts due to tree characteristics, fire-caused tree injury and life history traits contribute to resistance. In fall...
Author(s): Teresa Valor, Sharon M. Hood, Míriam Piqué, Asier Larrañaga, Pere Casals
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Implementation of wildfire- and climate-adaptation strategies in seasonally dry forests of western North America is impeded by numerous constraints and uncertainties. After more than a century of resource and land use change, some question the need for proactive management, particularly given novel social, ecological, and climatic...
Author(s): R. Keala Hagmann, Paul F. Hessburg, Susan J. Prichard, Nicholas A. Povak, Peter M. Brown, Peter Z. Fule, Robert E. Keane, Eric E. Knapp, Jamie M. Lydersen, Kerry L. Metlen, Matthew J. Reilly, Andrew Sanchez Meador, Scott L. Stephens, Jens T. Stevens, Alan H. Taylor, Larissa L. Yocom, Michael A. Battaglia, Derek J. Churchill, Lori D. Daniels, Donald A. Falk, Paul Henson, James D. Johnston, Meg A. Krawchuk, Carrie R. Levine, Garrett W. Meigs, Andrew G. Merschel, Malcolm P. North, Hugh Safford, Thomas W. Swetnam, Amy E. M. Waltz
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Altered climate, including weather extremes, can cause major shifts in vegetative recovery after disturbances. Predictive models that can identify the separate and combined temporal effects of disturbance and weather on plant communities and that are transferable among sites are needed to guide vulnerability assessments and...
Author(s): Cara Applestein, T. Trevor Caughlin, Matthew J. Germino
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires in many western North American forests are becoming more frequent, larger, and severe, with changed seasonal patterns. In response, coniferous forest ecosystems will transition toward dominance by fire-adapted hardwoods, shrubs, meadows, and grasslands, which may benefit some faunal communities, but not others. We describe...
Author(s): Henriette I. Jager, Jonathan Long, Rachel L. Malison, Brendan P. Murphy, Ashley J. Rust, Luiz G. M. Silva, Rahel Sollmann, Zachary L. Steel, Mark D. Bowen, Jason B. Dunham, Joseph L. Ebersole, Rebecca L. Flitcroft
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The unprecedented scale of the 2019-2020 eastern Australian bushfires exemplifies the challenges that scientists and conservation biologists face monitoring the effects on biodiversity in the aftermath of large-scale environmental disturbances. After a large-scale disturbance, conservation policy and management actions need to be...
Author(s): Casey Kirchhoff, Corey T. Callaghan, David A. Keith, Dony Indiarto, Guy Taseski, Mark K. J. Ooi, Tom D. Le Breton, Thomas Mesaglio, Richard T. Kingsford, William K. Cornwell
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The dead foliage of scorched crowns is one of the most conspicuous signatures of wildland fires. Globally, crown scorch from fires in savannas, woodlands, and forests causes tree stress and death across diverse taxa. The term crown scorch, however, is inconsistently and ambiguously defined in the literature, causing confusion and...
Author(s): J. Morgan Varner, Sharon M. Hood, Doug P. Aubrey, Kara M. Yedinak, J. Kevin Hiers, William Matt Jolly, Timothy M. Shearman, Jennifer K. McDaniel, Joseph J. O'Brien, Eric Rowell
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire is a dominant driver of ecosystem patterns and processes across the Rocky Mountains. This chapter describes fire ecology and fire-related management for the major forest types in the Rocky Mountains. Major forest types included are ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, mixed-conifer, lodgepole pine, spruce-fir, five-needle pines, and...
Author(s): Sharon M. Hood, Brian J. Harvey, Paula J. Fornwalt, Cameron Naficy, Winslow D. Hansen, Kimberley T. Davis, Michael A. Battaglia, Camille Stevens-Rumann, Victoria A. Saab
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfire is a dynamic natural process that continually shapes the structure and composition of landscapes. However, due to a combination of factors including climate change, management decisions and population growth, this natural process is having negative impacts on important ecosystem goods and services (EGS). It is critical to...
Author(s): Brooke R. Saari, Sonia A. Hall
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).