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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 3,600 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

32 results



Climate and social changes place strong demands on forest managers. Forest managers need powerful approaches and tools, which could help them to be able to react to the rapidly changing conditions. However, the complexity of quantifying forest ecosystems services as well as the complexity of current decision theories, technologies...
Author(s): Jan Kaspar, Pete Bettinger, Harald Vacik, Robert Marusak, Jordi Garcia-Gonzalo
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In response to large, severe wildfires in historically fire-adapted forests in the western US, policy initiatives, such as the USDA Forest Service’s Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program (CFLRP), seek to increase the pace and scale of ecological restoration. One required component of this program is collaborative...
Author(s): Jeffery B. Cannon, Kevin J. Barrett, Benjamin Gannon, Rob Addington, Michael A. Battaglia, Paula J. Fornwalt, Gregory H. Aplet, Anthony S. Cheng, Jeffrey L. Underhill, Jennifer S. Briggs, Peter M. Brown
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires across western North America have increased in number and size over the past three decades, and this trend will continue in response to further warming. As a consequence, the wildland–urban interface is projected to experience substantially higher risk of climate-driven fires in the coming decades. Although many plants,...
Author(s): Tania L. Schoennagel, Jennifer Balch, Hannah Brenkert-Smith, Philip E. Dennison, Brian J. Harvey, Meg A. Krawchuk, Nathan Mietkiewicz, Penelope Morgan, Max A. Moritz, Ray Rasker, Monica G. Turner, Cathy L. Whitlock
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Forest managers in the United States must respond to the need for climate-adaptive strategies in the face of observed and projected climatic changes. However, there is a lack of on-the-ground forest adaptation research to indicate what adaptation measures or tactics might be effective in preparing forest ecosystems to deal with...
Author(s): Linda Nagel, Brian J. Palik, Michael A. Battaglia, Anthony W. D'Amato, James M. Guldin, Christopher W. Swanston, Maria K. Janowiak, Matthew P. Powers, Linda A. Joyce, Constance I. Millar, David L. Peterson, Lisa Ganio, Chad Kirschbaum, Molly R. Roske
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfire and the threat it poses to society represents an example of the complex, dynamic relationship between social and ecological systems. Increasingly, wildfire adaptation is posited as a pathway to shift the approach to fire from a suppression paradigm that seeks to control fire to a paradigm that focuses on “living with” and “...
Author(s): Hannah Brenkert-Smith, James R. Meldrum, Patricia A. Champ, Christopher M. Barth
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The field of adaptive management has been embraced by researchers and managers in the United States as an approach to improve natural resource stewardship in the face of uncertainty and complex environmental problems. Integrating multiple knowledge sources and feedback mechanisms is an important step in this approach. Our objective...
Author(s): Christopher A. Armatas, Tyron J. Venn, Brooke Baldauf McBride, Alan E. Watson, Stephen J. Carver
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In montane forests of the Intermountain West composition and function are often defined by what happens with quaking aspen. Aspen is a pioneer species that regenerates quickly following disturbance and then establishes ecological conditions under which the rest of the biological community develops. Quaking aspen forests have high...
Author(s): Samuel B. St. Clair, Paul C. Rogers, Michael R. Kuhns
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Quaking aspen is generally considered to be a fire-adapted species because it regenerates prolifically after fire, and it can be replaced by more shade-tolerant tree species in the absence of fire. As early-successional aspen stands transition to greater conifer-dominance, they become increasingly fire prone, until fire returns, and...
Author(s): Douglas J. Shinneman, Kevin Krasnow, Susan K. McIlroy
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
The Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative (Y2Y) was established over 20 years ago as an experiment in large landscape conservation. Initially, Y2Y emerged as a response to large scale habitat fragmentation by advancing ecological connectivity. It also laid the foundation for large scale multi-stakeholder conservation...
Author(s): Gary M. Tabor, Anne Carlson, R. Travis Belote
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
The impacts of escalating wildfire in many regions — the lives and homes lost, the expense of suppression and the damage to ecosystem services — necessitate a more sustainable coexistence with wildfire. Climate change and continued development on fire-prone landscapes will only compound current problems. Emerging strategies for...
Author(s): Max A. Moritz, E. Batllori, Ross A. Bradstock, A. Malcolm Gill, J. Handmer, Paul F. Hessburg, J. Leonard, Sarah M. McCaffrey, Dennis C. Odion, Tania L. Schoennagel, Alexandra D. Syphard
Year Published: 2014
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).