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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,800 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

356 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Large, high‐severity wildfires are an important component of disturbance regimes around the world and can influence the structure and function of forest ecosystems. Climatic changes and anthropogenic disturbances have altered global disturbance patterns and increased the frequency of high‐severity wildfires worldwide. While the...
Author(s): Elle J. Bowd, David Blair, David B. Lindenmayer
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire has always been a driving factor of life on Earth. Now that mankind has definitely joined the other environmental forces in shaping the planet, lots of species are threatened by human-induced variation in fire regimes. Soil-dwelling organisms, i.e., those organisms that primarily live in soil, suffer the numerous and different...
Author(s): Giacomo Certini, Daniel Moya, Manuel E. Lucas-Borja, Giovanni Mastrolonardo
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests are increasingly experiencing high-severity, stand-replacing fires. Whereas alterations to aboveground ecosystems have been extensively studied, little is known about soil fungal responses in fire-adapted ecosystems. We implement a chronosequence of four different fires that varied in time...
Author(s): M. Fabiola Pulido-Chavez, Ernesto Alvarado, Thomas H. DeLuca, Robert L. Edmonds, Sydney I. Glassman
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The unprecedented scale of the 2019-2020 eastern Australian bushfires exemplifies the challenges that scientists and conservation biologists face monitoring the effects on biodiversity in the aftermath of large-scale environmental disturbances. After a large-scale disturbance, conservation policy and management actions need to be...
Author(s): Casey Kirchhoff, Corey T. Callaghan, David A. Keith, Dony Indiarto, Guy Taseski, Mark K. J. Ooi, Tom D. Le Breton, Thomas Mesaglio, Richard T. Kingsford, William K. Cornwell
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In the near future, a higher occurrence of wildfires is expected due to climate change, carrying social, environmental, and economic implications. Such impacts are often associated with an increase of post‐fire hydrological and erosive responses, which are difficult to predict. Soil erosion models have been proven to be a valuable...
Author(s): Ana Rita Lopes, Antonio Girona-García, Sofia Corticeiro, Ricardo Martins, Jan J. Keizer
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Identifying meaningful measures of ecological change over large areas is dependent on the quantification of robust relationships between ecological metrics and remote sensing products. Over the past several decades, ground observations of wildfire and prescribed fire severity have been acquired across hundreds of wildland fires in...
Author(s): Joshua J. Picotte, C. Alina Cansler, Crystal A. Kolden, James A. Lutz, Carl H. Key, Nathan C. Benson, Kevin M. Robertson
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
A typographical error in the original version of Table S1 as posted in 2012 has been brought to our attention. The coefficient in the Thomas (1963) equation (0.02665) is correct but the exponent should have read 0.667 and not 0.46. Any calculations using the equation on our part relied upon the correct exponent. We acknowledge...
Author(s): Martin E. Alexander, Miguel G. Cruz
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The increasing number of wildfires in southern Europe is making our ecosystem more vulnerable to water erosion; i.e., the loss of vegetation and subsequent runoff increase cause a shift in large quantities of sediment. Fire severity has been recognized as one of the most important parameters controlling the magnitude of post-fire...
Author(s): Ilenia Argentiero, Giovanni Francesco Ricci, Mario Elia, Marina D'Este, Vincenzo Giannico, Francisco Vito Ronco, Francesco Gentile, Giovanni Sanesi
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Increasing wildfire activity in western North America has the potential to remove forest canopy cover over large areas, increasing the vulnerability of understory plants and juvenile trees to microclimatic extremes. To understand the impacts of wildfire on forest microclimatic buffering, we monitored daily temperature and vapor...
Author(s): Kyra D. Wolf, Philip E. Higuera, Kimberley T. Davis, Solomon Z. Dobrowski
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Active wildfire seasons in the western U.S. warrant the evaluation of post‐fire forest management strategies. Ground‐based salvage logging is often used to recover economic loss of burned timber. In unburned forests, ground‐based logging often follows best management practices by leaving undisturbed areas near streams called stream...
Author(s): Peter R. Robichaud, Edwin D. Bone, Sarah A. Lewis, Erin S. Brooks, Robert E. Brown
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).