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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

201 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Prescribed fire is often used by land managers as an effective means of implementing fuel treatments to achieve a variety of goals. Smoke generated from these activities can put them at odds with air quality regulations. We set out to characterize the emission tradeoff between wildfire and prescribed fire in activity fuels from...
Author(s): Joshua C. Hyde, Eva K. Strand
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Epidemiologists use prediction models to downscale (i.e., interpolate) air pollution exposure where monitoring data is insufficient. This study compares machine learning prediction models for ground-level ozone during wildfires, evaluating the predictive accuracy of ten algorithms on the daily 8-h maximum average ozone during a 2008...
Author(s): Gregory L. Watson, Donatello Telesca, Colleen Reid, Gabriele G. Pfister, Michael Jerrett
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildland firefighters are exposed to wood smoke, which contains hazardous air pollutants, by suppressing thousands of wildfires across the U. S. each year. We estimated the relative risk of lung cancer and cardiovascular disease mortality from existing PM2.5 exposure-response relationships using measured PM4 concentrations from...
Author(s): Kathleen M. Navarro, Michael T. Kleinman, Chris E. Mackay, Timothy E. Reinhardt, John R. Balmes, George A. Broyles, Roger D. Ottmar, Luke P. Naher, Joseph W. Domitrovich
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfire is an essential earth‐system process, impacting ecosystem processes and the carbon cycle. Forest fires are becoming more frequent and severe, yet gaps exist in the modeling of fire on vegetation and carbon dynamics. Strategies for reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from wildfires include increasing tree harvest,...
Author(s): Jeffrey E. Stenzel, Kristina J. Bartowitz, Melannie D. Hartman, James A. Lutz, Crystal A. Kolden, Alistair M. S. Smith, Beverly E. Law, Mark E. Swanson, Andrew J. Larson, William J. Parton, Tara W. Hudiburg
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The FireFlux II experiment was conducted in a tall grass prairie located in south-east Texas on 30 January 2013 under a regional burn ban and high fire danger conditions. The goal of the experiment was to better understand micrometeorological aspects of fire spread. The experimental design was guided by the use of a coupled fire–...
Author(s): Craig B. Clements, Adam K. Kochanski, Daisuke Seto, Braniff Davis, Christopher Camacho, Neil Lareau, Jonathan Contezac, Joseph C. Restaino, Warren Heilman, Steven K. Krueger, Bret W. Butler, Roger D. Ottmar, Robert E. Vihnanek, James Flynn, Jean-Baptiste Filippi, Toussaint Barboni, Dianne E. Hall, Jan Mandel, Mary Ann Jenkins, Joseph J. O'Brien, Benjamin Hornsby, Casey Teske
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Epidemiologists use prediction models to downscale (i.e., interpolate) air pollution exposure where monitoring data is insufficient. This study compares machine learning prediction models for ground-level ozone during wildfires, evaluating the predictive accuracy of ten algorithms on the daily 8-h maximum average ozone during a 2008...
Author(s): Gregory L. Watson, Donatello Telesca, Colleen Reid, Gabriele G. Pfister, Michael Jerrett
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The damage caused by forest fire to forestry resources and economy is quite serious. As one of the most important characters of early forest fire, smoke is widely used as a signal of forest fire. In this paper, we propose a novel forest fire smoke detection method based on computer vision and diffusion model. Unlike the video-based...
Author(s): Yu Gao, Pengle Cheng
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The guide provides public health officials with the information they need to prepare for smoke events, communicate health risks and take measures to protect public health. It is also a valuable resource for anyone interested in learning more about what to do when smoke travels from nearby forest fires. This fourth edition of the...
Author(s): Susan Lyon Stone
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
A new statistical model for predicting daily ground level fine scale particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations at monitoring sites in the western United States was developed and tested operationally during the 2016 and 2017 wildfire seasons. The model is site-specific, using a multiple linear regression schema that relies on the...
Author(s): Amy Marsha, Narasimhan K. Larkin
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The extent of the Earth’s surface burned annually by fires is affected by a number of drivers, including but not limited to climate. Other important drivers include the amount and type of vegetation (fuel) available and human impacts, including fire suppression, ignition, and conversion of burnable land to crops. Prior to the...
Author(s): Karen L. Riley, A. Park Williams, Shawn P. Urbanski, David E. Calkin, Karen C. Short, Christopher D. O'Connor
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).