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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

214 results


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In recent decades, as wildland fire occurrence has increased in the United States, concern about the emissions produced by wildland fires has increased as well. This growing concern is evidenced by an increase in scientific articles investigating effects of wildland smoke on public health, and ongoing research projects assessing...
Author(s): Heath D. Starns, Douglas R. Tolleson, Robert J. Agnew, Elijah G. Schnitzler, John R. Weir
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 μm (PM2.5) is one of the main pollutants generated in wildfire events with negative impacts on human health. In research involving wildfires and air quality, it is common to use emission models. However, the commonly used emission approach can generate errors and contradict the...
Author(s): Joseph Sánchez-Balseca, Agustí Pérez-Foguet
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fine particulate matter emissions (PM2.5) from landscape biomass fires, both prescribed and wild, pose a significant public health risk, with smoke exposure seasonally impacting human populations through both highly concentrated local plumes, and more dispersed regional haze. A range of technologies now exist for mapping and...
Author(s): Grant J. Williamson, Christopher Lucani
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Smoke emissions from wildland fires contribute to concentrations of atmospheric particulate matter and greenhouse gases, influencing public health and climate. Prediction of emissions is critical for smoke management to mitigate the effects on visibility and air quality. Models that predict emissions require estimates of the amount...
Author(s): Maureen C. Kennedy, Susan J. Prichard, Donald McKenzie, Nancy H. F. French
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Extreme wildfire events are becoming more common and while the immediate risks of particulate exposures to susceptible populations (i.e., elderly, asthmatics) are appreciated, the long-term health effects are not known. In 2017, the Seeley Lake (SL), MT area experienced unprecedented levels of wildfire smoke from July 31 to...
Author(s): Ava Orr, Cristi A. L. Migliaccio, Mary Buford, Sarah Ballou, Christopher T. Migliaccio
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
As we enter the wildfire season in the northern hemisphere, the potential for a dangerous interaction between SARS-CoV-2 and smoke pollution should be recognized and acknowledged. This is challenging because the public health threat of COVID-19 is immediate and clear, whereas the public health threat of wildfire smoke seems distant...
Author(s): Sarah B. Henderson
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Globally, wildfires are increasing in frequency and severity, exposing populations to toxic trace elements stored within forests. Trace element and Pb isotope compositions in aerosols (n = 87) from four major wildfires near Sydney, Australia (1994-2004) were evaluated (Mood’s median test) to determine any significant differences in...
Author(s): Cynthia F. Isley, Mark Patrick Taylor
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildland firefighters are directly exposed to elevated levels of wildland fire (WF) smoke. Although studies demonstrate WF smoke exposure is associated with lung function changes, few studies that use invasive sample collection methods have been conducted to investigate underlying biochemical changes. These methods are also either...
Author(s): Chieh-Ming Wu, Anna M. Adetona, Chi Song, Luke P. Naeher, Olorunfemi Adetona
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires are a serious threat to ecosystems and human life. Usually, smoke is generated before the flame, and due to the diffusing nature of the smoke, we can detect smoke from a distance, so wildfire smoke detection is especially important for early warning systems. In this paper, we propose a 3D convolution-based encoder–decoder...
Author(s): Guodong Zhu, Zhenxue Chen, Chengyun Liu, Xuewen Rong, Weikai He
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Inhaling wildfire smoke can be harmful, but smoke from unintended wildfires may be worse than smoke from prescribed burns, according to a study published in 2019. That means the health risks from wildfires — like the ones that have destroyed millions of acres and turned the sky blood orange this fall in California, Oregon and...
Author(s): Casey Crownhart
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).