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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,800 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

249 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Violent fire-driven convection can manifest as towering pyrocumulus (pyroCu) or pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb) clouds, which can have devastating impacts on the environment and society. Their associated fire spread is erratic, unpredictable and not generally suppressible. Research into large pyroconvective events has mainly focused on...
Author(s): Rachel Badlan, J. Sharples, Jason P. Evans, Richard H. D. McRae
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The globe is struggling with concurrent planetary health emergencies: COVID-19 and wildfires worsened by human activity. Unfortunately, a lack of awareness of climate change as a health issue, as well as of the interconnections between biodiversity loss, habitat change, inequality, and zoonotic infections risks having decision...
Author(s): Attila J. Hertelendy, Courtney Howard, Roberto de Almeida, Kate Charlesworth, Lwando Maki
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Air pollution, particularly fine and ultrafine particulate matter aerosols, underlies a wide range of communicable and non-communicable disease affecting many systems including the cardiopulmonary and immune systems, and arises primarily from transportation and industry. A number of air pollution driven diseases also are Covid19...
Author(s): Ira Leifer, Michael T. Kleinman, Donald R. Blake, David Tratt, Charlotte Marston
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Exposure to wildfire smoke continues to be a growing threat to public health, yet the chemical components in wildfire smoke that primarily drive toxicity and associated disease are largely unknown. This study utilized a suite of computational approaches to identify groups of chemicals induced by variable biomass burn conditions that...
Author(s): Julia E. Rager, Jeliyah Clark, Lauren A. Eaves, Vennela Avula, Nicole M. Niehoff, Yong Ho Kim, Ilona Jaspers, M. Ian Gilmour
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The impacts of wildfires on the health of children are becoming a more urgent matter as wildfires become more frequent, intense and affecting, not only forested areas, but also urban locations. It is important that medical professionals be prepared to provide information to patients and families on how to minimize the adverse health...
Author(s): Deborah L. McBride
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Effective strategies to reduce indoor air pollutant concentrations during wildfire smoke events are critically needed. Worldwide, communities in areas prone to wildfires may suffer from annual smoke exposure events lasting from days to weeks. In addition, there are many areas of the world where high pollution events are common and...
Author(s): Gilliane Davison, Karoline K. Barkjohn, Gayle Hagler, Amara L. Holder, Sarah Coefield, Curtis W. Noonan, Beth Hassett-Sipple
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) represents the greatest ambient air pollution risk to health. Wildfires and managed burns, together referred to hereafter as ‘landscape’ fires, are a significant PM2.5 source in many regions worldwide, able to affect air quality in areas far away from the fires themselves. We use 0.125°, 3...
Author(s): Gareth Roberts, Martin J. Wooster
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildland fire activity and associated emission of particulate matter air pollution is increasing in the United States over the last two decades due primarily to a combination of increased temperature, drought, and historically high forest fuel loading. The regulatory monitoring networks in the Unites States are mostly concentrated...
Author(s): Jonathan Krug, Russell W. Long, Maribel Colón, Andrew Habel, Shawn P. Urbanski, Matthew S. Landis
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The public health emergency associated with the 2019–20 bushfires in Australia was a wake-up call to increase the resilience of our health systems to respond to climate extremes. We must combine our understanding of predictions of extreme weather events with our knowledge on emergency preparedness and response to protect the health...
Author(s): Aparna Lal, Mahomed Patel, Arnagretta Hunter, Christine Phillips
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
PM2.5 is the most monitored air pollutant for which EPA has set national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS). As such, it is the pollutant on which the Air Quality Index (AQI) is most often based. PM2.5 and PM10 are the only criteria pollutant whose composition, and therefore toxicity varies. The PM2.5 AQI does not account for...
Author(s): Odelle Hadley, Anthony Cutler, Ruth Schumaker, Robin Bond
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).