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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 3,600 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

171 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

In the last few decades, the number of people living in fire-prone ecosystems has increased, placing more people and private property at risk to future fire events. Substantial research has demonstrated consistent public support for the use of prescribed fires in fuel-reduction efforts; however, continuing public concern regarding...
Author(s): Kathleen M. Rose, Eric Toman, Christine Olsen
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires and prescribed fires produce emissions that are harmful to human health. These health effects, however, are difficult to quantify, likely in part due to sparse data on exposure. The ability to measure fire emissions as they reach sensitive areas is critical to ensuring the protection of public health. Ground level...
Author(s): John Volckens, Scott Kelleher
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Wildfires emit significant amounts of pollutants that degrade air quality. Plumes from three wildfires in the western U.S. were measured from aircraft during the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) and the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP), both in...
Author(s): Xiaoxi Liu, L. Gregory Huey, Robert J. Yokelson, Vanessa Selimovic, Isobel J. Simpson, Markus Muller, Jose L. Jimenez, Pedro Campuzano-Jost, Andreas J. Beyersdorf, Donald R. Blake, Zachary Butterfield, Yonghoon Choi, John D. Crounse, Douglas A. Day, Glenn S. Diskin, Manvendra K. Dubey, Edward Fortner, Thomas F. Hanisco, Weiwei Hu, Laura E. King, Lawrence Kleinman, Simone Meinardi, Tomas Mikoviny, Timothy B. Onasch, Brett B. Palm, Jeff Peischl, Ilana B. Pollack, Thomas B. Ryerson, Glen W. Sachse, Arthur J. Sedlacek, John E. Shilling, Stephen Springston, Jason M. St. Clair, David J. Tanner, Alexander P. Teng, Paul O. Wennberg, Armin Wisthaler, Glenn M. Wolfe
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildland fire smoke is a complex mixture of air contaminants that have the potential cause adverse health effects. Individuals can be exposed occupationally if they work as wildland firefighters or public exposure from ambient air that is contaminated with smoke from a nearby or distant wildland fire. Previous studies of public...
Author(s): Joe Domitrovich, George Broyles, Roger D. Ottmar, Timothy E. Reinhardt, Luke P. Naeher, Michael T. Kleinman, Kathleen M. Navarro, Christopher E. Mackay, Olorunfemi Adetona
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Emissions of aerosols and gases from fires have been shown to adversely affect US air quality at local to regional scales as well as downwind regions far away from the source. In addition, smoke from fires negatively affects humans, ecosystems, and climate. Recent observations have shown an upward trend of area burned over western...
Author(s): Jeffrey R. Pierce, Maria Val Martin, Colette L. Heald
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Exposure to smoke emitted from wildfire and planned burns (i.e., smoke events) has been associated with numerous negative health outcomes, including respiratory symptoms and conditions. This rapid review investigates recent evidence (post-2009) regarding the effectiveness of public health messaging during smoke events. The...
Author(s): Jennifer A. Fish, Micah D. J. Peters, Imogen Ramsey, Greg Sharplin, Nadia Corsini, Marion Eckert
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article, Synthesis
Wildfire episodes are becoming more rampant with global warming and climate change. Every year it causes lot of damage in terms of burnt acres and also impacts the air quality and climate through emission of various trace greenhouse gases. As emissions from large fires increase with time, it is essential to monitor the extent and...
Author(s): Bokhwa Kim, Sudipta Sarkar
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Smoke from fire can sharply reduce air quality by releasing particulate matter, one of the most dangerous types of air pollution for human health. A third of U.S. households have someone sensitive to smoke. Minimizing the amount and impact of smoke is a high priority for land managers and regulators. One tool for achieving that goal...
Author(s): Rachel White, Paul F. Hessburg, Narasimhan K. Larkin, J. Morgan Varner
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Wildland firefighters suppressing wildland fires or conducting prescribed fires work long shifts and are exposed to high levels of smoke with no respiratory protection. Inhalation of smoke is a safety concern for wildland firefighters and can potentially impair their performance and cause short and long term health impacts.
Author(s): Kathleen M. Navarro, Stacey S. Frederick
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Smoke is made up of a complex mixture of gases and fine particles produced when wood and other organic materials burn. The biggest health threat from smoke is from fine particles. These microscopic particles can penetrate deep into your lungs. They can cause a range of health problems, from burning eyes and a runny nose to...
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).