Home
A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,800 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

218 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Fast-moving wildfires can result in substantial losses of infrastructure, property and life. During such events, real-time intelligence is critical for managing firefighting activities and public safety. The ability of fixed-site weather radars to detect the plumes from fires has long been recognized; however, quantitative methods...
Author(s): Thomas J. Duff, Derek M. Chong, Trent D. Penman
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Prescribed fire, intentionally ignited low-intensity fires, and managed wildfires—wildfires that are allowed to burn for land management benefit—could be used as a land management tool to create forests that are resilient to wildland fire. This could lead to fewer large catastrophic wildfires in the future. However, we must consider...
Author(s): Kathleen M. Navarro, D.W. Schweizer, John R. Balmes, Ricardo Cisneros
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires are a major source of air pollutants in the United States. Wildfire smoke can trigger severe pollution episodes with substantial impacts on public health. In addition to acute episodes, wildfires can have a marginal effect on air quality at significant distances from the source, presenting significant challenges to air...
Author(s): Shawn P. Urbanski, Matthew C. Reeves, Rachel E. Corley, Robin P. Silverstein, Wei Min Hao
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Prescribed fires are regulated by states and are always subject to strict air-quality standards. Their use must be planned carefully to keep the smoke they produce at acceptable levels. Managers can predict the direction of smoke plumes by relying on meteorological reports and using computer models. Managers avoid smoke-sensitive...
Author(s): Carrie Berger, Stephen A. Fitzgerald, Daniel Leavell, Janice L. Peterson
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
To meet the data requirements of physics-based fire models and FASMEE objectives, traditional fuel and consumption measures need to be integrated with spatially explicit, three-dimensional data. One of the challenges of traditional fuel measurement techniques is that they must either remove or alter the fuels that are a primary...
Author(s): Andrew T. Hudak, Susan J. Prichard, Robert E. Keane, E. Louise Loudermilk, Russell A. Parsons, Carl A. Seielstad, Eric Rowell, Nick Skowronski
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Wildfires have significant effects on human populations, economically, environmentally, and in terms of their general well-being. Smoke pollution, in particular, from either prescribed burns or uncontrolled wildfires, can have significant health impacts. Some estimates suggest that smoke dispersion from fire events may affect the...
Author(s): Sonya Sachdeva, Sarah M. McCaffrey, Dexter Locke
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires emit significant amounts of pollutants that degrade air quality. Plumes from three wildfires in the western U.S. were measured from aircraft during the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) and the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP), both in...
Author(s): Xiaoxi Liu, L. Gregory Huey, Robert J. Yokelson, Vanessa Selimovic, Isobel J. Simpson, Markus Muller, Jose L. Jimenez, Pedro Campuzano-Jost, Andreas J. Beyersdorf, Donald R. Blake, Zachary Butterfield, Yonghoon Choi, John D. Crounse, Douglas A. Day, Glenn S. Diskin, Manvendra K. Dubey, Edward Fortner, Thomas F. Hanisco, Weiwei Hu, Laura E. King, Lawrence Kleinman, Simone Meinardi, Tomas Mikoviny, Timothy B. Onasch, Brett B. Palm, Jeff Peischl, Ilana B. Pollack, Thomas B. Ryerson, Glen W. Sachse, Arthur J. Sedlacek, John E. Shilling, Stephen Springston, Jason M. St. Clair, David J. Tanner, Alexander P. Teng, Paul O. Wennberg, Armin Wisthaler, Glenn M. Wolfe
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Prescribed burns of winter wheat stubble and Kentucky bluegrass fields in northern Idaho and eastern Washington states (U.S.A.) were sampled using ground-, aerostat-, airplane-, and laboratory-based measurement platforms to determine emission factors, compare methods, and provide a current and comprehensive set of emissions data for...
Author(s): Amara L. Holder, Brian K. Gullett, Shawn P. Urbanski, Robert Elleman, Susan M. O'Neill, Dennis Tabor, William Mitchell, Kirk R. Baker
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Past and current forest management affects wildland fire smoke impacts on downwind human populations. However, mismatches between the scale of benefits and risks make it difficult to proactively manage wildland fires to promote both ecological and public health. Building on recent literature and advances in modeling smoke and health...
Author(s): Jonathan Long, Leland W. Tarnay, Malcolm P. North
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wind erosion of soils burned by wildfire contributes substantial particulate matter (PM) in the form of dust to the atmosphere, but the magnitude of this dust source is largely unknown. It is important to accurately quantify dust emissions because they can impact human health, degrade visibility, exacerbate dust-on-snow issues (...
Author(s): Natalie S. Wagenbrenner, Serena H. Chung, Brian K. Lamb
Year Published: 2017
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

Pages

XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).