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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are nearly 4,000 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

137 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Prescribed fire is often used by land managers as an effective means of implementing fuel treatments to achieve a variety of goals. Smoke generated from these activities can put them at odds with air quality regulations. We set out to characterize the emission tradeoff between wildfire and prescribed fire in activity fuels from...
Author(s): Joshua C. Hyde, Eva K. Strand
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildland firefighters are exposed to wood smoke, which contains hazardous air pollutants, by suppressing thousands of wildfires across the U. S. each year. We estimated the relative risk of lung cancer and cardiovascular disease mortality from existing PM2.5 exposure-response relationships using measured PM4 concentrations from...
Author(s): Kathleen M. Navarro, Michael T. Kleinman, Chris E. Mackay, Timothy E. Reinhardt, John R. Balmes, George A. Broyles, Roger D. Ottmar, Luke P. Naher, Joseph W. Domitrovich
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The FireFlux II experiment was conducted in a tall grass prairie located in south-east Texas on 30 January 2013 under a regional burn ban and high fire danger conditions. The goal of the experiment was to better understand micrometeorological aspects of fire spread. The experimental design was guided by the use of a coupled fire–...
Author(s): Craig B. Clements, Adam K. Kochanski, Daisuke Seto, Braniff Davis, Christopher Camacho, Neil Lareau, Jonathan Contezac, Joseph C. Restaino, Warren Heilman, Steven K. Krueger, Bret W. Butler, Roger D. Ottmar, Robert E. Vihnanek, James Flynn, Jean-Baptiste Filippi, Toussaint Barboni, Dianne E. Hall, Jan Mandel, Mary Ann Jenkins, Joseph J. O'Brien, Benjamin Hornsby, Casey Teske
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The damage caused by forest fire to forestry resources and economy is quite serious. As one of the most important characters of early forest fire, smoke is widely used as a signal of forest fire. In this paper, we propose a novel forest fire smoke detection method based on computer vision and diffusion model. Unlike the video-based...
Author(s): Yu Gao, Pengle Cheng
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The extent of the Earth’s surface burned annually by fires is affected by a number of drivers, including but not limited to climate. Other important drivers include the amount and type of vegetation (fuel) available and human impacts, including fire suppression, ignition, and conversion of burnable land to crops. Prior to the...
Author(s): Karen L. Riley, A. Park Williams, Shawn P. Urbanski, David E. Calkin, Karen C. Short, Christopher D. O'Connor
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Most of the previous investigations on the relationship between PM2.5 chemical characteristics and wildfire focused on the predictions of particle components concentrations or future pollution scenarios. Little research has focused on trends analyses based on large temporal datasets. Our research addresses this gap by quantifying...
Author(s): Weeberb J. Requia, Brent A. Coull, Petros Koutrakis
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires have been increasing in frequency in the western United States (US) with the 2017 and 2018 fire seasons experiencing some of the worst wildfires in terms of suppression costs and air pollution that the western US has seen. Although growing evidence suggests respiratory exacerbations from elevated fine particulate matter (...
Author(s): Colleen Reid, Ellen M. Considine, Gregory L. Watson, Donatello Telesca, Gabriele G. Pfister, Michael Jerrett
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Smoke from human-induced fires such as prescribed fires can occasionally cause significant reduction in visibility on highways in the southern United States. Visibility reduction to less than three meters has been termed 'superfog' and environmental conditions that lead to its formation have been proposed previously. Accurate...
Author(s): Christian Bartolome, M. Princevac, David R. Weise, Shankar M. Mahalingam, Masoud Ghasemian, Akula Venkatram, Henry Vu, Guillermo Aguilar
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire smoke is a major contributor to both particulate matter (PM) and ozone exposure in urban centers. Epidemiological, clinical, and toxicological studies have demonstrated a casual relationship between these pollutants and cardiovascular and respiratory related deaths and illnesses. Given the expected increase in fire events due...
Author(s): Brian J. Reich, Ana G. Rappold, Fay H. Johnston, Geoffrey G. Morgan, Neal L. Fann, Martin E. Cope, Richard A. Broome
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
A novel approach is presented to analyze smoke exposure and provide a metric to quantify health-related impacts. Our results support the current understanding that managing low-intensity fire for ecological benefit reduces exposure when compared to a high-intensity full suppression fire in the Sierra Nevada of California. More...
Author(s): D.W. Schweizer, Haiganoush K. Preisler, Ricardo Cisneros
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).