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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

451 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Globally, savanna ecosystems are shifting outside of “safe operating spaces” due to removal of their primary self-reinforcing feedback—fire—and subsequent erosion of disturbance legacies. Restoring savannas will require reinstating fire feedbacks. But knowledge gaps in the nature of historic fire regimes and how mechanisms such as...
Author(s): Caleb P. Roberts, Victoria M. Donovan, Sarah M. Nodskov, Emma C. Keele, Craig D. Allen, David A. Wedin, Dirac Twidwell
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Increases in burned area across the western US since the mid‐1980’s have been widely documented and linked partially to climate factors, yet evaluations of trends in fire severity are lacking. Here, we evaluate fire severity trends and their interannual relationships to climate for western US forests from 1985‐2017. Significant...
Author(s): Sean A. Parks, John T. Abatzoglou
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire refugia—locations that burn less severely or less frequently than surrounding areas—support late-successional and old-growth forest structure and function. This study investigates the influence of topography and fuels on the probability of forest fire refugia under varying fire weather conditions. We focused on recent large...
Author(s): Garrett W. Meigs, Christopher J. Dunn, Sean A. Parks, Meg A. Krawchuk
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Aim: Functional traits are a crucial link between species distributions and the ecosystem processes that structure those species’ niches. Concurrent increases in the availability of functional trait data and our ability to model species distributions present an opportunity to develop functional trait biogeography (i.e., the mapping...
Author(s): Jens T. Stevens, Matthew M. Kling, Dylan W. Schwilk, J. Morgan Varner, Jeffrey M. Kane
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Legacy effects from one disturbance may influence successional pathways by amplifying or buffering forest regeneration after the next disturbance. We assessed vegetation and tree regeneration in non-serotinous Sierra lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. murrayana) stands after a 1984 wildfire which burned with variable severity and...
Author(s): Lucas B. Harris, Stacy Drury, Alan H. Taylor
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Changing disturbance regimes and climate can overcome forest ecosystem resilience. Following high-severity fire, forest recovery may be compromised by lack of tree seed sources, warmer and drier postfire climate, or short-interval reburning. A potential outcome of the loss of resilience is the conversion of the prefire forest to a...
Author(s): Jonathan D. Coop, Sean A. Parks, Camille Stevens-Rumann, Shelley Crausbay, Philip E. Higuera, Matthew D. Hurteau, Alan J. Tepley, Ellen Whitman, Timothy J. Assal, Brandon M. Collins, Kimberley T. Davis, Solomon Z. Dobrowski, Donald A. Falk, Paula J. Fornwalt, Peter Z. Fule, Brian J. Harvey, Van R. Kane, Caitlin E. Littlefield, Ellis Q. Margolis, Malcolm P. North, Marc-Andre Parisien, Susan J. Prichard, Kyle Rodman
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Within the realms of both wildland and prescribed fire, an understanding of how fire severity and forest structure interact is critical for improving fuels treatment effectiveness, quantifying the ramifications of wildfires, and improving fire behavior modeling. We integrated high resolution estimates of fire severity with multi-...
Author(s): Nick Skowronski, Michael R. Gallagher, Timothy A. Warner
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Burn severity is the ecological change resulting from wildland fires. It is often mapped by using prefire and postfire satellite imagery and classified as low, moderate, or high. Areas burned with high severity are of particular concern to land managers and others because postfire vegetation, soil, and other important ecosystem...
Author(s): Gregory K. Dillon, Matthew Panunto, Brett Davis, Penelope Morgan, Donovan Birch, William Matt Jolly
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Fire severity in forests is often defined in terms of post-fire tree mortality, yet the influences on tree mortality following fire are not fully understood. Pre-fire growth may serve as an index of vigour, indicating resource availability and the capacity to recover from injury and defend against pests. For trees that are not...
Author(s): Phillip J. van Mantgem, Donald A. Falk, Emma C. Williams, Adrian J. Das, Nathan L. Stephenson
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Multiple, simultaneous environmental changes, in climatic/abiotic factors, interacting species, and direct human influences, are impacting natural populations and thus biodiversity, ecosystem services, and evolutionary trajectories. Determining whether the magnitudes of the population impacts of abiotic, biotic, and anthropogenic...
Author(s): William F. Morris, Johan Ehrlén, Johan P. Dahlgren, Alexander K. Loomis, Allison M. Louthan
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).