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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,000 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

378 results


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Mean frequencies were about 120 years for valleys and montane slopes and 150 years for subalpine slopes in this western larch/Douglas-fir forest from 1735 to 1976. Fires were small and moderately intense with occasional high intensity runs. Single burns thinned the overstory favoring mixed conifer regeneration. Multiple burns...
Author(s): Kathleen M. Davis
Year Published: 1980
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings, Technical Report or White Paper
Recent fire-scar studies in the northern Rocky Mountains have documented forest fire history over the past few centuries. They reveal that in some forest types fire maintained many-aged open stands of seral trees. In other types, major fires caused replacement of the stands. Often, however, fires burned at variable intensities,...
Author(s): Stephen F. Arno
Year Published: 1980
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Presents preliminary results of a two-year study examining the pattern of Indian fires in western Montana's lower elevation forests. Interviews and historic journals were used to reconstruct the characteristics of aboriginal burning. Fire scar data from paired stands indicate substantial differences in fire frequency between Indian...
Author(s): Stephen W. Berrett
Year Published: 1980
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
Dead woody fuels were sampled in 16 upland forest stands representing a chronosequence of forest successional stages. Different fuel components show different temporal patterns, but adequate levels of all components necessary for an intense crown fire are not present simultaneously until stand age 300-400 yr. Therefore, the average...
Author(s): William H. Romme
Year Published: 1980
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings, Technical Report or White Paper
Fire frequencies averaged 32 to 70 years in sagebrush-grass communities. Early spring and late fall fires are the least harmful to perennial grasses, although small plants and those with coarse stems are more tolerant of fire than large plants and those with leafy stems. Cheatgrass can be suppressed by burning in early summer, but...
Author(s): Henry A. Wright, Leon F. Neuenschwander, Carlton M. Britton
Year Published: 1979
Type: Document : Synthesis, Technical Report or White Paper
Presents frequencies, intensities, and influences of fire on stand structure and composition on the Bitterroot National Forest in west-central Montana. Three study areas were established, each having a wide range of elevations and forest types. Findings are based upon study of nearly 900 individual fire scars on living trees, and on...
Author(s): Stephen F. Arno
Year Published: 1976
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Establishment of western larch (Larix occidentalis Nutt.) seedlings is favored by site preparation that reduces both the duff layer and the sprouting potential of competing vegetation. A cooperative study of the use of fire in silviculture in northwestern Montana provided conditions to research the effectiveness of prescribed...
Author(s): Raymond C. Shearer
Year Published: 1975
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Height of slash fire smoke columns, commonly thought to be a function of atmospheric conditions alone, through a series of 10-acre experimental fires is shown to be strongly related to fire intensity. By conducting intense fires, land managers can possibly burn forest debris and still maintain air quality when atmospheric conditions...
Author(s): Rodney A. Norum
Year Published: 1974
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
One objective of wilderness and parkland fire ecology research is to describe the relationships between fire and unmanaged ecosystems, so that strategies can be determined that will provide a more nearly natural incidence of fire. More than 50 years of efforts directed toward exclusion of wildland fires in the Northern Rocky...
Author(s): James R. Habeck, Robert W. Mutch
Year Published: 1973
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
A sample of 40 fire-scarred trees was used to reconstruct the frequency and size of fires during the past 300-400 years in northern Yellowstone National Park. Best estimates of frequency suggested mean intervals of about 20-25 years between fires, after adjustments had been made for the recent influence of modern man. Agreement in...
Author(s): Douglas B. Houston
Year Published: 1973
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).