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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 3,600 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

340 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

In 1998 the General Accounting Office presented to Congress a comprehensive assessment of the wildfire threat to western national forests. The GAO report stated 'In 1995, the [Forest Service] agency estimated that 39 million acres are now at risk of large, uncontrollable, catastrophic fires.' The national assessment and mapping...
Type: Media : Video
Wildfires in the southern Rocky Mountain region have increased in size, frequency, and severity over the past three decades, but forest recovery following high severity wildfire events is uncertain in this region. We studied conifer regeneration in 11 fires in Colorado, South Dakota, and Wyoming in unburned, low-to-moderately burned...
Type: Media : Webinar
Shrub species demonstrate flexible responses to wildfire disturbance severity that are reflected in shrub patch dynamics at small and intermediate scales. Prior research has examined the dynamics and persistence of large shrub patches on the landscape; our work focuses on individuals or groups of individual shrubs. Shrub patches...
Type: Media : Video
Certain areas are experiencing longer fire seasons, with more frequent and severe droughts. Wildfire detection, monitoring, and mitigation is increasingly important in these regions. Satellite remote sensing data is useful for identifying active fires, evaluating burned areas, and assessing fire emissions. This advanced training...
Type: Media : Webinar
A recent surge of scientific knowledge and interest in fire climatology derives from two factors: increasing understanding of broad-scale ocean-atmosphere climate forcings, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation, and their teleconnections to regional and local patterns of droughts and wildfires, and mounting evidence that global...
Type: Media : Webinar
Mixed severity fire regimes historically maintained landscape heterogeneity in fuels and ecological conditions, which limited fire spread and supported diverse species assemblages. Setting goals for ecosystem management and restoration targets in in these forests, where the frequency, severity, and effects of...
Type: Media : Webinar
During this Webinar, Dr. Safford contrasted the ecology and temporal trends (historical to current to projected future) of lower montane (oak woodland, yellow pine, mixed conifer) vs. upper montane (red fir) and subalpine forests in the Sierra Nevada, focusing on impacts of three classes of environmental stressors: climate change,...
Type: Media : Webinar
Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS) is a multi-year, interagency project designed to consistently map the location, extent and associated burn severity of large fires occurring on all lands of the United States from 1984 to present. The suite of mapping, data and analysis products facilitated by the project are derived from...
Type: Media : Webinar
The pressures facing quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) forests in the Intermountain West are multifaceted. Fire suppression, climate change and browsing pressure by ungulates are just several of the factors that threaten the health of this foundation species. Here we present two leading scientists in North America who study aspen...
Type: Media : Webinar
Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS) is a multi-year, interagency project designed to consistently map the location, extent and associated burn severity of large fires occurring on all lands of the United States from 1984 to present. The suite of mapping, data and analysis products facilitated by the project are derived from...
Type: Media : Webinar

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).