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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,000 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

378 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

The development of frameworks for better-understanding ecological syndromes and putative evolutionary strategies of plant adaptation to fire has recently received a flurry of attention, including a new model hypothesizing that plants have diverged into three different plant flammability strategies due to natural selection. We...
Author(s): Helen M. Poulos, Andrew M. Barton, Jasper A. Slingsby, David M. J. S. Bowman
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
When disturbances recur at rates shorter than an ecosystems rate of recovery, it has the potential to result in significant changes to ecosystem structure and function. In western US forests, wildfire activity has increased and many severely burned areas are now re-burning before reforestation occurs. Historically, some of these...
Author(s): Kristen L. Shive, Scott L. Stephens
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
As climate change alters global fire regimes, fire and forest managers must prioritize management actions that simultaneously protect sensitive resources and allow fire to maintain its ecological role. Over the last twenty years, this task has become more difficult, as increased fire severity and season length have caused...
Author(s): Diana F. Tomback, Elizabeth R. Pansing
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Natural resource managers need to know how past wildfires influence the severity and ecological effects of subsequent wildfires fires in order to make informed decisions during and after wildfire events, and to effectively plan for the future. The overarching goals for this study were to quantify and compare the effects of single...
Author(s): Andrew J. Larson, R. Travis Belote
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Reconstructing historical fire regimes is difficult at the landscape scale, but essential to determine whether modern fires are unnaturally severe. I synthesized evidence across 725,000 ha of montane forests in the San Juan Mountains, Colorado, from forest atlases, forest-reserve reports, fire-scar studies, early reports, and...
Author(s): William L. Baker
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Alpine treelines are expected to move upward in a warming climate, but downward in response to increases in wildfire. We studied the effects of fire on vegetation structure and composition across four alpine treeline ecotones extending from Abies lasiocarpa/Picea engelmannii forests at lower elevations, through Pinus albicaulis/...
Author(s): C. Alina Cansler, Donald McKenzie, Charles B. Halpern
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildland fire is a critical process in forests of the western United States (US). Variation in fire behavior, which is heavily influenced by fuel loading, terrain, weather, and vegetation type, leads to heterogeneity in fire severity across landscapes. The relative influence of these factors in driving fire severity, however, is...
Author(s): Sean A. Parks, Lisa M. Holsinger, Matthew Panunto, William Matt Jolly, Solomon Z. Dobrowski, Gregory K. Dillon
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
For millennia, wildfires have markedly influenced forests and non-forested landscapes of the western United States (US), and they are increasingly seen as having substantial impacts on society and nature. There is growing concern over what kinds and amounts of fire will achieve desirable outcomes and limit harmful effects on people...
Author(s): Max A. Moritz, Christopher Topik, Craig D. Allen, Paul F. Hessburg, Penelope Morgan, Dennis C. Odion, Thomas T. Veblen, Ian M. McCullough
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Roughly 3% of the Earth's land surface burns annually, representing a critical exchange of energy and matter between the land and atmosphere via combustion. Fires range from slow smouldering peat fires, to low-intensity surface fires, to intense crown fires, depending on vegetation structure, fuel moisture, prevailing climate, and...
Author(s): Sally Archibald, Caroline E. R. Lehmann, Claire M. Belcher, William J. Bond, Ross A. Bradstock, Anne Laure Daniau, K. G. Dexter, Elisabeth J. Forrestel, M. Greve, Tianhua He, Steven I. Higgins, William A. Hoffmann, Byron B. Lamont, D. J. McGlinn, G. R. Moncrieff, Colin P. Osborne, Juli G. Pausas, Owen F. Price, Brad S. Ripley, Brendan M. Rogers, Dylan W. Schwilk, M. F. Simon, Merritt R. Turetsky, Guido R. Van der Werf, Amy E. Zanne
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Given regional increases in fire activity in western North American forests, understanding how fire influences the extent and effects of subsequent fires is particularly relevant. Remotely sensed estimates of fire effects have allowed for spatial portioning into different severity categories based on the degree of fire-caused...
Author(s): Brandon M. Collins, Jamie M. Lydersen, Richard G. Everett, Scott L. Stephens
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).