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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

451 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Determining whether forest landscapes can maintain their resilience to fire – that is, their ability to rebound and sustain – given rapid climate change and increasing fire activity is a pressing challenge throughout the American West. Many western forests are well adapted to fire, and even subalpine forests that experience...
Author(s): Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Increasing wildfire activity in western North America has the potential to remove forest canopy cover over large areas, increasing the vulnerability of understory plants and juvenile trees to microclimatic extremes. To understand the impacts of wildfire on forest microclimatic buffering, we monitored daily temperature and vapor...
Author(s): Kyra D. Wolf, Philip E. Higuera, Kimberley T. Davis, Solomon Z. Dobrowski
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The idea that not all fire regimes are created equal is a central theme in fire research and conservation. Fire frequency (i.e., temporal scale) is likely the most studied fire regime attribute as it relates to conservation of fireadapted ecosystems. Generally, research converges on fire frequency as the primary filter in plant...
Author(s): David Mason, Marcus A. Lashley
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Active wildfire seasons in the western U.S. warrant the evaluation of post‐fire forest management strategies. Ground‐based salvage logging is often used to recover economic loss of burned timber. In unburned forests, ground‐based logging often follows best management practices by leaving undisturbed areas near streams called stream...
Author(s): Peter R. Robichaud, Edwin D. Bone, Sarah A. Lewis, Erin S. Brooks, Robert E. Brown
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Runoff and erosion processes can increase after wildfire and post‐fire salvage logging, but little is known about the specific effects of soil compaction and surface cover after post‐fire salvage logging activities on these processes. We carried out rainfall simulations after a high‐severity wildfire and post‐fire salvage logging to...
Author(s): Sergio A. Prats, Maruxa C. Malvar, Joseph W. Wagenbrenner
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Summary: Historical fire regimes in plains grassland and prairie ecosystems of central North America are characterized by frequent fires with return intervals ranging from 1 to 35 years. Frequent fires removed accumulated litter, stimulated native grass production, and impeded establishment and spread of cacti and woody plants....
Author(s): Kristin L. Zouhar
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
The unprecedented scale of the 2019-2020 eastern Australian bushfires exemplifies the challenges that scientists and conservation biologists face monitoring the effects on biodiversity in the aftermath of large-scale environmental disturbances. After a large-scale disturbance, conservation policy and management actions need to be...
Author(s): Casey Kirchhoff, Corey T. Callaghan, David A. Keith, Dony Indiarto, Guy Taseski, Mark K. J. Ooi, Tom D. Le Breton, Thomas Mesaglio, Richard T. Kingsford, William K. Cornwell
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The increasing number of wildfires in southern Europe is making our ecosystem more vulnerable to water erosion; i.e., the loss of vegetation and subsequent runoff increase cause a shift in large quantities of sediment. Fire severity has been recognized as one of the most important parameters controlling the magnitude of post-fire...
Author(s): Ilenia Argentiero, Giovanni Francesco Ricci, Mario Elia, Marina D'Este, Vincenzo Giannico, Francisco Vito Ronco, Francesco Gentile, Giovanni Sanesi
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
In the near future, a higher occurrence of wildfires is expected due to climate change, carrying social, environmental, and economic implications. Such impacts are often associated with an increase of post‐fire hydrological and erosive responses, which are difficult to predict. Soil erosion models have been proven to be a valuable...
Author(s): Ana Rita Lopes, Antonio Girona-García, Sofia Corticeiro, Ricardo Martins, Jan J. Keizer
Year Published: 2021
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Here, we show that the last century of fire suppression in the western U.S. has resulted in fire intensities that are unique over more than 900 years of record in ponderosa pine forests (Pinus ponderosa). Specifically, we use the heat-sensitive luminescence signal of archaeological ceramics and tree-ring fire histories to show that...
Author(s): Christopher I. Roos, T. M. Rittenour, Thomas W. Swetnam, Rachel A. Loehman, Kacy L. Hollenback, Matthew J. Liebmann, Dana Drake Rosenstein
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).