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Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,000 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinar & Video Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

417 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Here, we show that the last century of fire suppression in the western U.S. has resulted in fire intensities that are unique over more than 900 years of record in ponderosa pine forests (Pinus ponderosa). Specifically, we use the heat-sensitive luminescence signal of archaeological ceramics and tree-ring fire histories to show that...
Author(s): Christopher I. Roos, T. M. Rittenour, Thomas W. Swetnam, Rachel A. Loehman, Kacy L. Hollenback, Matthew J. Liebmann, Dana Drake Rosenstein
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire is a complex Earth system phenomenon that fundamentally affects vegetation distributions, biogeochemical cycling, climate, and human society across most of Earth's land surface. Fire regimes are currently changing due to multiple interacting global change drivers, most notably climate change, land use, and direct human...
Author(s): Brendan M. Rogers, Jennifer Balch, Scott J. Goetz, Caroline E. R. Lehmann, Merritt R. Turetsky
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Nearly a century of fire suppression in most forested land of the United States has limited researchers’ ability to construct and rigorously test conceptual models of forest structural development in mixed-conifer ecosystems. As a result, land managers must rely on conceptual models of forest development that may overemphasize...
Author(s): Julia Berkey, R. Travis Belote, Colin T. Maher, Andrew J. Larson
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Disturbance refugia – locations that experience less severe or frequent disturbances than the surrounding landscape – provide a framework to highlight not only where and why these biological legacies persist as adjacent areas change but also the value of those legacies in sustaining biodiversity. Recent studies of disturbance...
Author(s): Meg A. Krawchuk, Garrett W. Meigs, Jennifer Cartwright, Jonathan D. Coop, Raymond J. Davis, Andrés Holz, Crystal A. Kolden, Arjan J. H. Meddens
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Increasing the pace and scale of fuel treatments to protect social and ecological values from severe wildfire is a major initiative of numerous land management agencies, organizations, and collaborative groups throughout the western United States, including the Colorado Front Range. Broadcast prescribed fire is a relatively low-cost...
Author(s): Rob Addington, Brian G. Tavernia, Michael D. Caggiano, Matthew P. Thompson, Jason D. Lawhon, John S. Sanderson
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Following a wildfire, regeneration to forest can take decades to centuries and is no longer assured in many western U.S. environments given escalating wildfire severity and warming trends. After large fire years, managers prioritize where to allocate scarce planting resources, often with limited information on the factors that drive...
Author(s): Nicholas A. Povak, Derek J. Churchill, C. Alina Cansler, Paul F. Hessburg, Van R. Kane, Jonathan T. Kane, James A. Lutz, Andrew J. Larson
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Background: The Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS) program has been providing the fire science community with large fire perimeter and burn severity data for the past 14 years. As of October 2019, 22 969 fires have been mapped by the MTBS program and are available on the MTBS website (https://www.mtbs.gov(link is external))....
Author(s): Joshua J. Picotte, Krishna Bhattarai, Danny Howard, Jennifer Lecker, Justin Epting, Brad Quayle, Nathan C. Benson, Kurtis J. Nelson
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Land surface phenology (LSP) characterizes the timing and greenness of seasonal vegetation growth in satellite pixels and it has been widely used to associate with climate change. However, wildfire, causing considerable land surface changes, exerts abrupt changes on the LSP magnitudes and great influences on the LSP long-term trends...
Author(s): Jianmin Wang, Xiaoyang Zhang
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Assessing wildfire regimes and their environmental drivers is critical for effective land management and conservation. We used Landsat imagery to describe the wildfire regime of the north-eastern Simpson Desert (Australia) between 1972 and 2014, and to quantify the relationship between wildfire extent and rainfall. Wildfires...
Author(s): Elise M. Verhoeven, Brad R. Murray, Christopher R. Dickman, Glenda M. Wardle, Aaron C. Greenville
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Developing standardised classification of post-fire responses is essential for globally consistent comparisons of woody vegetation communities. Existing classification systems are based on responses of species growing in fire-prone environments. To accommodate species that occur in rarely burnt environments, we have suggested some...
Author(s): Lynda D. Prior, David M. J. S. Bowman
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).