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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

154 results


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Restoration of non-sprouting shrubs after wildfire is increasingly becoming a management priority. In the western U.S., Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) restoration is a high priority, but sagebrush establishment from seed is sporadic. In contrast, planting seedlings often...
Author(s): Kirk W. Davies, Jonathan D. Bates, Chad S. Boyd
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Wildfires change plant community structure and impact wildlife habitat and population dynamics. Recent wildfire‐induced losses of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ) in North American shrublands are outpacing natural recovery and leading to substantial losses in habitat for sagebrush‐obligate species such as Greater Sage‐grouse....
Author(s): David A. Pyke, Robert K. Shriver, Robert S. Arkle, David S. Pilliod, Cameron L. Aldridge, Peter S. Coates, Matthew J. Germino, Julie A. Heinrichs, Mark A. Ricca, Scott E. Shaff
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The impact of wildfires and of restoration actions on soil organic matter (SOM) content and structure was studied in a soil under pine (Pinus pinea) from Doñana National Park (SW Spain). Samples were collected from burnt areas before (B) and after post-fire restoration (BR) and compared with an unburnt (UB) site. Analytical...
Author(s): Nicasio T. Jiménez-Morillo, Gonzalo Almendros, José M. de la Rosa, Antonio Jordán, Lorena M. Zavala, Arturo J. P. Granged, José A. González-Pérez
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
With the effects of climate change expected to intensify over the coming century, land managers will require more proactive and novel approaches to conserve and restore threatened ecosystems. In the US Intermountain West, quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) is a foundation species of considerable conservation interest....
Author(s): Alexander A. Howe, Simon M. Landhäusser, Owen T. Burney, James N. Long, Randall D. Violett, Karen Mock
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Increasing the pace and scale of fuel treatments to protect social and ecological values from severe wildfire is a major initiative of numerous land management agencies, organizations, and collaborative groups throughout the western United States, including the Colorado Front Range. Broadcast prescribed fire is a relatively low-cost...
Author(s): Rob Addington, Brian G. Tavernia, Michael D. Caggiano, Matthew P. Thompson, Jason D. Lawhon, John S. Sanderson
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Following a wildfire, regeneration to forest can take decades to centuries and is no longer assured in many western U.S. environments given escalating wildfire severity and warming trends. After large fire years, managers prioritize where to allocate scarce planting resources, often with limited information on the factors that drive...
Author(s): Nicholas A. Povak, Derek J. Churchill, C. Alina Cansler, Paul F. Hessburg, Van R. Kane, Jonathan T. Kane, James A. Lutz, Andrew J. Larson
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Nearly half of the vast sagebrush steppe in the western United States has lost many or nearly all native plant species, largely due to the interaction of invasive species and increased wildfire. Re-establishing sagebrush, a keystone component of these ecosystems, has become a management focus in recent decades using aerial broadcast...
Author(s): Cara Applestein, T. Trevor Caughlin, Matthew J. Germino
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Exotic grasses are a widespread set of invasive species that are notable for their ability to significantly alter key aspects of ecosystem function. Understanding the role and importance of these invaders in forested landscapes has been limited but is now rising, as grasses from Eurasia and Africa continue to spread through...
Author(s): Becky K. Kerns, Claire Tortorelli, Michelle A. Day, Ty Nietupski, Ana M. G. Barros, John Kim, Meg A. Krawchuk
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Prescribed fire is a vital tool for mitigating wildfire hazard and restoring ecosystems in many western North American forest types. However, there can be considerable variability in fuel consumption from prescribed burns, which affects both hazard mitigation and emissions. In the present study, data from replicated, repeat-entry...
Author(s): Jacob I. Levine, Brandon M. Collins, Robert A. York, Daniel E. Foster, Danny L. Fry, Scott L. Stephens
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
After generations of fire-suppression policy, Indigenous fire management (IFM) is being reactivated as one way to mitigate wildfire in fire-prone ecosystems. Research has documented that IFM also mitigates carbon emissions, improves livelihoods and enhances well-being among participants. This study documents the goals of the Yunesit...
Author(s): William Nikolakis, Emma Roberts, Ngaio Hotte, Russell Myers Ross
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).