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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

178 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Purpose of Review: I sought to review the contributions of recent literature and prior foundational papers to our understanding of drought and fire. In this review, I summarize recent literature on drought and fire in the western USA and discuss research directions that may increase the utility of that body of work for twenty-first...
Author(s): Jeremy S. Littell
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Abrupt ecological changes occur rapidly relative to typical rates of ecosystem change and are increasingly observed in ecosystems worldwide, thereby challenging adaptive capacities. Abrupt ecological changes can arise from many processes, only some of which are transitions between alternative states. Focusing solely on the mean...
Author(s): Zak Ratjczak, S. R. Carpenter, A. R. Ives, Chris J. Kucharik, T. Ramiadantsoa, A. M. Stegner, J. Williams, J. Zhang, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Environmental change is accelerating in the 21st century, but how multiple drivers may interact to alter forest resilience remains uncertain. In forests affected by large high-severity disturbances, tree regeneration is a resilience linchpin that shapes successional trajectories for decades. We modeled stands of two widespread...
Author(s): Winslow D. Hansen, Kristin H. Braziunas, Werner Rammer, Rupert Seidl, Monica G. Turner
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The development of frameworks for better-understanding ecological syndromes and putative evolutionary strategies of plant adaptation to fire has recently received a flurry of attention, including a new model hypothesizing that plants have diverged into three different plant flammability strategies due to natural selection. We...
Author(s): Helen M. Poulos, Andrew M. Barton, Jasper A. Slingsby, David M. J. S. Bowman
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire creates challenges and opportunities for wildlife through rapid destruction, modification and creation of habitat. Fire has spatially variable effects on landscapes; however, for species that benefit from the ephemeral resource patches created by fire, it is critical to understand characteristics of fires that promote postfire...
Author(s): Morgan W. Tingley, Andrew N. Stillman, Robert L. Wilkerson, Christine A. Howell, Sarah C. Sawyer, Rodney B. Siegel
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Over the past 15 years, 3 million hectares of forests have been converted into shrublands or grasslands in the Mediterranean countries of the European Union. Fire and drought are the main drivers underlying this deforestation. Here we present a conceptual framework for the process of fire‐induced deforestation based on the...
Author(s): Asaf Karavani, Matthias M. Boer, Mara Baudena, Carlos Colinas, Rubén Díaz‐Sierra, Jesús Pemán, Martín de Luis, Álvaro Enríquez‐de‐Salamanca, Víctor Resco de Dios
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Expanding the footprint of natural fire has been proposed as one potential solution to increase the pace of forest restoration programs in fire‐adapted landscapes of the western USA. However, studies that examine the long‐term socio‐ecological trade‐offs of expanding natural fire to reduce wildfire risk and create fire resilient...
Author(s): Ana M. G. Barros, Alan A. Ager, Michelle A. Day, Meg A. Krawchuk, Thomas A. Spies
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Extensive high‐severity wildfires have driven major losses of ponderosa pine and mixed‐conifer forests in the southwestern United States, in some settings catalyzing enduring conversions to non‐forested vegetation types. Management interventions to reduce the probability of stand‐replacing wildfire have included mechanical fuel...
Author(s): Ryan B. Walker, Jonathan D. Coop, Sean A. Parks, Laura Trader
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The ecological literature offers many conflicting recommendations for how managers should respond to ecosystem change and novelty. We propose a framework in which forest managers may achieve desired forest characteristics by combining strategies for (1) restoring historical conditions, (2) maintaining current conditions, and (3)...
Author(s): Adena R. Rissman, Kevin D. Burke, Heather A. Kramer, Volker C. Radeloff, Paul R. Schilke, Owen A. Selles, Rachel H. Toczydlowski, Chloe B. Wardropper, Lori A. Barrow, Jennifer L. Chandler, Katelyn Geleynse, Andrew W. L'roe, Katherine M. Laushman, A. Lisa Schomaker
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Although burned trees are the most visible damage following a wildfire, a forest’s soil can also be damaged. The heat generated by a wildfire can alter the soil’s physical properties and kill the fungi and bacteria that are responsible for nutrient cycling and other ecosystem services. What isn’t well understood is the extent of the...
Author(s): Andrea Watts, Jane E. Smith, Ariel D. Cowan, Ari A. Jumpponen
Year Published: 2018
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).