Home
A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
Bringing People Together & Sharing Knowledge in the Northern Rockies

Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

178 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Aims: Wildfires in dry forest ecosystems in western North America are producing fire effects that are more severe than historical estimates, raising concerns about the resilience of these landscapes to contemporary disturbances. Despite increasing fire activity, relatively little is known about the structure and composition of fire...
Author(s): William M. Downing, Meg A. Krawchuk, Jonathan D. Coop, Garrett W. Meigs, Sandra L. Haire, Ryan B. Walker, Ellen Whitman, Geneva W. Chong, Carol Miller, Claire Tortorelli
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Previous research has suggested that prescribed fire will become more necessary in the northern Great Plains of the United States as woody encroachment and invasive plant species cover increase. Prescribed fire will likely become a more frequent management strategy to mimic natural processes in grasslands-a combination of fire and...
Author(s): Katherine C. Kral-O'Brien, Kevin K. Sedivec, Benjamin A. Geaumont, Amanda L. Gearhart
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
California’s high density, fire-excluded forests experienced an extreme drought accompanied by warmer than normal temperatures from 2012 to 2015, resulting in the deaths of millions of trees. We examined tree mortality and growth of mixed-conifer stands that had been experimentally treated between 2011 and 2013 with two different...
Author(s): Eric E. Knapp, Alexis Bernal, Jeffrey M. Kane, Christopher J. Fettig, Malcolm P. North
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
This review is focused on tree seedling regeneration for several reasons. First, a high mortality event, like a high- severity wildfire, kills the mature trees needed to maintain forest cover. When fire-caused mortality is minimal, we are less concerned about tree regeneration, but a high severity fire creates the need for tree...
Author(s): Camille Stevens-Rumann, Penelope Morgan, Kimberley T. Davis, Kerry Kemp, Jarod Blades
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Synthesis
Goals of fostering ecological resilience are increasingly used to guide U.S. public land management in the context of anthropogenic climate change and increasing landscape disturbances. There are, however, few operational means of assessing the resilience of a landscape or ecosystem. We present a method to evaluate resilience using...
Author(s): Robert E. Keane, Sharon M. Hood, Rachel A. Loehman, Lisa M. Holsinger, Philip E. Higuera, Donald A. Falk
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Conference Proceedings
Wildfires are ecosystem‐level drivers of structure and function in many vegetated biomes. While numerous studies have emphasized the benefits of fire to ecosystems, large wildfires have also been associated with the loss of ecosystem services and shifts in vegetation abundance. The size and number of wildfires are increasing across...
Author(s): Victoria M. Donovan, Dirac Twidwell, Daniel R. Uden, Tsegaye Tadesse, Brian D. Wardlow, Christine H. Bielski, Matthew O. Jones, Brady W. Allred, David E. Naugle, Craig R. Allen
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Research Highlights: This experiment compares a range of combinations of harvest, prescribed fire, and wildfire. Leveraging a 30-year-old forest management-driven experiment, we explored the recovery of woody species composition, regeneration of the charismatic forest tree species Larix occidentalis Nutt., and vegetation and soil...
Author(s): R. Kasten Dumroese, Martin F. Jurgensen, Deborah S. Page-Dumroese
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Increased wildfire activity combined with warm and dry post-fire conditions may undermine the mechanisms maintaining forest resilience to wildfires, potentially causing ecosystem transitions, or fire-catalyzed vegetation shifts. Stand-replacing fire is especially likely to catalyze vegetation shifts expected from climate change, by...
Author(s): Kimberley T. Davis, Philip E. Higuera, Solomon Z. Dobrowski, Sean A. Parks, John T. Abatzoglou, Monica T. Rother, Thomas T. Veblen
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Many large fires have burned in recent decades across western North America, and this trend is projected to continue as conditions become warmer and drier. Recovery processes have been studied more thoroughly 1-2 years post fire than in the longer term. Fuel and fire managers need better information on long-term post-fire ecosystem...
Author(s): Andrew T. Hudak, Leda N. Kobziar, Karen L. Riley
Year Published: 2020
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The United States' National Cohesive Wildfire Management Strategy aims to achieve greater social and ecological resilience to wildfire. It also raises the question: cohesive for whom and for what purpose? In this article, we address the wildfire response goal and what a cohesive response means. Namely, we define a cohesive response...
Author(s): Toddi A. Steelman, Branda Nowell
Year Published: 2019
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

Pages

XLSResearch and Publications Database

These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).