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A JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network
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Research and Publications Database

The NRFSN research and publications database leads users to regionally relevant fire science. There are more than 4,700 documents, which have been carefully categorized by the NRFSN to highlight topics and ecosystems important in the Northern Rockies Region. Categorized resources include records from the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).

Note: Additional Northern Rockies fire research is available from our Webinars & Recorded Media Archive, which provides access to webinars, videos, podcasts, storymaps, and seminars.

Hints: By default, the Search Terms box reads and searches for terms as if there were AND operators between them. To search for one or more terms, use the OR operator. Use quotation marks around phrases or to search for exact terms. To maximize the search function, use the Search Terms box for other information (e.g. author(s), date, species of interest, additional fire topics) together with the topic, ecosystem, and/or resource type terms from the lists. Additional information is available in our documents on topics, ecosystems, and types.

175 results


Select a Topic, and the sub-topic terms will appear.

Every year wildland fires affect much more acreage in the United States compared to controlled burns. Like controlled burns, wildland fire can help promote biological diversity and healthy ecosystems. But despite these facts, wildland fire is not often considered as a fuel treatment in the United States. Scientists working with the...
Author(s): Brian Cooke
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
Increasingly, objectives for forests with moderate- or mixed-severity fire regimes are to restore successionally diverse landscapes that are resistant and resilient to current and future stressors. Maintaining native species and characteristic processes requires this successional diversity, but methods to achieve it are poorly...
Author(s): Paul F. Hessburg, Thomas A. Spies, David A. Perry, Carl N. Skinner, Alan H. Taylor, Peter M. Brown, Scott L. Stephens, Andrew J. Larson, Derek J. Churchill, Nicholas A. Povak, Peter H. Singleton, Brenda McComb, William J. Zielinski, Brandon M. Collins, R. Brion Salter, Jerry F. Franklin, Gregg M. Riegel
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Fire frequency in low-elevation coniferous forests in western North America has greatly declined since the late 1800s. In many areas, this has increased tree density and the proportion of shade-tolerant species, reduced resource availability, and increased forest susceptibility to forest insect pests and high-severity wildfire. In...
Author(s): Sharon M. Hood, Stephen P. Baker, Anna Sala
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
The concept of resilience has permeated the discourse of many land use and environmental agencies in an attempt to articulate how to develop and implement policies concerned with the social and ecological dimensions of natural disturbances. Several distinct definitions of resilience exist, each with its own concepts, focus and...
Author(s): Cassandra Moseley, R. Patrick Bixler, Christopher Bone, Kirsten Vinyeta
Year Published: 2016
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Understanding the rates, trajectories, and spatial variability in succession following severe wildfire is increasingly important for forest managers in western North America and critical for anticipating the resilience or vulnerability of forested landscapes to changing environmental conditions. However, few long-term...
Author(s): Monica G. Turner, William H. Romme, Daniel B. Tinker, Daniel C. Donato, Brian J. Harvey
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Technical Report or White Paper
Quaking aspen is generally considered to be a fire-adapted species because it regenerates prolifically after fire, and it can be replaced by more shade-tolerant tree species in the absence of fire. As early-successional aspen stands transition to greater conifer-dominance, they become increasingly fire prone, until fire returns, and...
Author(s): Douglas J. Shinneman, Kevin Krasnow, Susan K. McIlroy
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Research Brief or Fact Sheet
1. Anthropogenic global change compromises forest resilience, with profound impacts to ecosystem functions and services. This synthesis paper re flects on the current understanding of forest resilience and potential tipping points under environmental change and explores challenges to assessing responses using experiments,...
Author(s): Christopher P. O. Reyer, Niels Brouwers, Anja Rammig, Barry W. Brook, Jackie Epila, Robert F. Grant, Milena Holmgren, Fanny Langerwisch, Sebastian Leuzinger, Wolfgang Lucht, Belinda Medlyn, Marion Pfeifer, Jorg Steinkamp, Mark C. Vanderwel, Hans Verbeeck, Dora M. Villela
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Induced defense is a common plant strategy in response to herbivory. Although abiotic damage, such as physical wounding, pruning, and heating, can induce plant defense, the effect of such damage by large-scale abiotic disturbances on induced defenses has not been explored and could have important consequences for plant survival...
Author(s): Sharon M. Hood, Anna Sala, Emily K. Heyerdahl, Marion Boutin
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Forest degradation is a global environmental issue, but its definition is problematic. Difficulties include choosing appropriate reference states, timescales, thresholds, and forest values. We dispense with many such ambiguities by interpreting forest degradation through the frame of ecological resilience, and with reference to...
Author(s): Jaboury Ghazoul, Zuzana Burivalova, John Garcia-Ulloa, Lisa A. King
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article
Despite highly specialised and capable emergency management systems, ordinary citizens are usually first on the scene in an emergency or disaster, and remain long after official services have ceased. Citizens often play vital roles in helping those affected to respond and recover, and can provide invaluable assistance to official...
Author(s): Joshua Whittaker, Blythe McLennan, J. Handmer
Year Published: 2015
Type: Document : Book or Chapter or Journal Article

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These resources are compiled in partnership with the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP), Fire Research and Management Exchange System (FRAMES), and Fire Effects Information System (FEIS).